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Archive for the ‘surveillance’ category

Jul 14, 2019

Can I Check Web Sites Visited by my Kids/Staff?

Posted by in categories: computing, internet, policy, privacy, security, software, surveillance

Early this morning, I was asked this question at Quora. It’s a pretty basic request of network administrators, including parents, schools and anyone who administers a public, sensitive or legally exposed WiFi hot spot.

Is there a quick and easy way to view, log, or otherwise monitor the web sites visited by people on your home or office network?

Yes. It’s free and and it is pretty easy to do.

It gets a bit trickier, if the individual on your network is using a VPN service that they have configured on their device.[1] A VPN does not stop you from logging their browsing, but all of their activity will point to the VPN address instead of the site that they are actually visiting. In that case, there is another way to monitor their activity. See note #1, below.

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Jul 5, 2019

China Snares Tourists’ Phones in Surveillance Dragnet

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, surveillance

BEIJING — China has turned its western region of Xinjiang into a police state with few modern parallels, employing a combination of high-tech surveillance and enormous manpower to monitor and subdue the area’s predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities.

Now, the digital dragnet is expanding beyond Xinjiang’s residents, ensnaring tourists, traders and other visitors — and digging deep into their smartphones.

A team of journalists from The New York Times and other publications examined a policing app used in the region, getting a rare look inside the intrusive technologies that China is deploying in the name of quelling Islamic radicalism and strengthening Communist Party rule in its Far West. The use of the app has not been previously reported.

Jul 3, 2019

Space Fence: Connecting the Surveillance and Transhumanist Agendas

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, military, mobile phones, robotics/AI, satellites, surveillance, transhumanism

Betty Lim


Is a massive, planetary-wide, space surveillance system currently being constructed that aims to monitor you all the way down to your DNA. Officially, the Space Fence is, according to Wikipedia, a 2nd generation space surveillance system being built (started in 2014) by the US Air Force and Lockheed Martin to track artificial satellites and space debris. Its budget is US$1.594 billion, it’s expected to be operational in 2019 and the Space Fence facility will be located in the Marshall Islands along with an option for another radar site in Western Australia. The Space Fence is a resurrection of a program started by Reagan in the 1980s called SDI (Strategic Defense Initiative), commonly known by its nickname “Star Wars.” However, like many exotic weapons of the New World Order, it has a cover purpose and a real purpose. This article exposes the grander implications of the Space Fence – and how it connects to other technology that could be used to enslave you.

What is the Space Fence?

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Jun 30, 2019

When convenience meets surveillance: AI at the corner store

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, surveillance

At some convenience stores, an A.I. system may bar the door if you look like the suspected criminals in its database, or if you’re wearing a mask. That’s part of the growing use of facial recognition and video analytics, a…

Jun 26, 2019

Retailers Are Judging Consumers

Posted by in categories: business, education, government, information science, surveillance

China isn’t the only country with a draconian “social credit score” system — there’s one quite a bit like it operating in the U.S. Except that it’s being run by American businesses, not the government.

There’s plenty of evidence that retailers have been using a technique called “surveillance scoring” for decades in which consumers are given a secret score by an algorithm to give them a different price — but for the same goods and services.

But the practice might be illegal after all: a California nonprofit called Consumer Education Foundation (CEF) filed a petition yesterday asking for the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to look into the shady practice.

Jun 26, 2019

International Space Station Will Test 3D-Printed Materials In Orbit

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, satellites, surveillance

New 3D-printed materials are going to space thanks to a recently funded partnership between Israel’s NanoDimension and Florida’s Harris Corp.

The companies plan to create new materials to reduce the manufacturing of small satellites, an exceedingly popular market right now for applications ranging from weather observations to remote surveillance.

They aim to fly their materials on an external platform of the International Space Station for a year. The goal is to better understand how 3D-printed components (such as circuits and materials) withstand the space environment, which includes extreme temperature swings and high radiation. The launch date of the project was not disclosed.

Jun 24, 2019

How the Pentagon’s Skynet Would Automate War

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, drones, military, surveillance

Mass surveillance, drone swarms, cyborg soldiers, telekinesis, synthetic organisms, and laser beams will determine future conflict by 2030.

Jun 21, 2019

Amazon patents ‘surveillance as a service’ tech for its delivery drones

Posted by in categories: drones, habitats, surveillance

Including technology that cuts out footage of your neighbor’s house.

Jun 16, 2019

AI-Aided Video Surveillance Will Watch and Silently Judge Us

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, security, surveillance

Gone are the days when a store’s security cameras only mattered to shoplifters.

Now, with the rising prevalence of surveillance systems constantly monitored by artificial intelligence, ubiquitous security systems can watch, learn about, and discriminate against shoppers more than ever before.

That’s the gist of a new ACLU report titled “The Dawn of Robot Surveillance,” about how emerging AI technology enables security companies to constantly monitor and collect data about people — opening new possibilities in which power is abused or underserved communities are overpoliced.

Jun 12, 2019

Wireless devices go battery-free with new communication technique

Posted by in categories: energy, internet, surveillance

This technology is also used for surveillance.


We might be one step closer to an Internet-of-things reality.

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