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Archive for the ‘economics’ category

Jun 18, 2018

Why a minor change to how EPA makes rules could radically reduce environmental protection

Posted by in categories: economics, government

Since the Reagan administration, federal agencies have been required to produce cost-benefit analyses of their major regulations. These assessments are designed to ensure that regulators are pursuing actions that make society better off.

In my experience working on the White House economic team in the Clinton and Obama administrations, I found cost-benefit provides a solid foundation for understanding the impacts of regulatory proposals. It also generates thoughtful discussion of ways to design rules to maximize net benefits to the public.

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Jun 17, 2018

Foxconn looks to AI after maker of Apple and Amazon products celebrates 30 years in China

Posted by in categories: economics, robotics/AI

That growth in factory worker salaries has been a double-edged sword for China. On one hand, it has increased the purchasing power of Chinese which in turn has powered consumer-led economic growth, but on the other it has made China less competitive on wages and forced companies like Foxconn to introduce more automation.


With 1 million employees and half a dozen factories contributing 4 per cent of the country’s export value, Foxconn’s expansion symbolises China’s role as tech manufacturing powerhouse.

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Jun 16, 2018

The Next Plague Is Coming. Is America Ready?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, policy

Yet even the U.S. is disturbingly vulnerable—and in some respects is becoming quickly more so. It depends on a just-in-time medical economy, in which stockpiles are limited and even key items are made to order. Most of the intravenous bags used in the country are manufactured in Puerto Rico, so when Hurricane Maria devastated the island last September, the bags fell in short supply. Some hospitals were forced to inject saline with syringes—and so syringe supplies started runn…ing low too. The most common lifesaving drugs all depend on long supply chains that include India and China—chains that would likely break in a severe pandemic. “Each year, the system gets leaner and leaner,” says Michael Osterholm, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota. “It doesn’t take much of a hiccup anymore to challenge it.”


The epidemics of the early 21st century revealed a world unprepared, even as the risks continue to multiply. Much worse is coming.

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Jun 15, 2018

Hong Kong Market Could Open Cash Flood Gates for U.S. Biotechs — Bioquark Inc.

Posted by in categories: aging, biotech/medical, business, economics, finance, health, innovation, life extension, neuroscience, science

Jun 13, 2018

If the Robots Come for Our Jobs, What Should the Government Do?

Posted by in categories: economics, employment, government, robotics/AI

But there’s a recent lesson worth learning from. Globalization and automation caused upheaval in the manufacturing industry from the 1980s through the early 2000s, and millions of factory workers lost their jobs. The disruption to communities is still being felt, and is arguably at the root of a lot of the biggest social and economic problems of this era.


Some big ideas are starting to percolate. But less dramatic ones might work, too.

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Jun 12, 2018

These are the world’s most future-proof cities

Posted by in categories: economics, sustainability

As technology changes the way people live and work, cities are undergoing an unprecedented transformation. Those that have the infrastructure and strategy to manage this rapid technological shift are set to become the most competitive.

Globally, city economies in India, Vietnam and China have the strongest short-term momentum. The pace and scale of change in these markets is extraordinary, as they build out their skylines and infrastructure platforms to meet booming demand. While these changes present opportunities, many of these cities are facing challenges to their longer-term development prospects, with strains on infrastructure, high levels of inequality, issues around affordability, and environmental degradation.

Such rapid transformation is often eye-catching. But it is cities that are investing in a sustainable future, and laying the groundwork for ongoing success, that deserve recognition. These cities are “future-proofing” to ensure positive, long-term momentum. Key elements of future-proofing include: the ability to drive and manage technological change; infrastructure that contributes to a high quality of life; a long-term city vision; and attracting and retaining talent.

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Jun 11, 2018

Technical Analysis: Can it predict future asset value?

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, business, cryptocurrencies, economics, finance

I love clearing the air with a single dismissive answer to a seemingly complex question. Short, dismissive retorts are definitive, but arrogant. It reminds readers that I am sometimes a smart a*ss.

Is technical analysis a reasoned approach for
investors to predict future value of an asset?

In a word, the answer is “Hell No!”. (Actually, that’s two words. Feel free to drop the adjective). Although many technical analysts earnestly believe their craft, the approach has no value and does not hold up to a fundamental approach.

One word arrogance comes with an obligation to substantiate—and, so, let’s begin with examples of each approach.

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Jun 10, 2018

America is unprepared for the “jobs apocalypse” automation will bring

Posted by in categories: economics, employment, robotics/AI

Millions of low-skilled workers who are already being pushed out will need to adapt to the new economy.

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Jun 7, 2018

The decline of our oceans is accelerating, but it’s not too late to stop it

Posted by in categories: economics, energy, sustainability

We shouldn’t underestimate the powerful attraction of a ‘sustainable blue economy’, which – I firmly believe – will feed and support the lives of our children and those who come after them. Getting it right – whether through aquaculture, offshore energy, green shipping or ecotourism – is vital not just for SDG14, but for the future of the global commons, and for humankind itself. To do this we must move with purposeful steps. Here are five that could be taken immediately.

Curtail subsidies

Let us stop throwing good money after bad, and resolve to prohibit subsidies that support harmful and illegal fishing. A critical opportunity to eliminate them is looming at the 2019 ministerial meeting of the World Trade Organisation. It must not be missed.

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Jun 6, 2018

Now that everything can be tokenized, banks are taking notice

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, economics, finance

From the figures above, the past year has highlighted how pretty much anything can be put on the blockchain as a way of raising capital. But as it provides access to greater liquidity to investors rather than a conventional equity investment, it’s also demonstrating how a tokenized world is steadily being seen as the norm.

As Krauwer states, though, for an actual token economy to emerge, buyers would need insight in what they buy. “Token owners would need to know how they can keep track of the underlying asset. In addition, they would need a way to store their tokens and trade them with others.”

Not only that, but sellers would benefit from such a platform that would capture their assets in a token and connect them with possible buyers. Additionally, providing some type of quality assurance on top of the tokens would help too.

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