Blog

Archive for the ‘biotech/medical’ category

Jun 21, 2018

Is aging not scary? The children’s tales that are killing us

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, life extension

Today we will be taking a look at some of the stories people tell themselves to help them pretend aging is not a problem.


If you ask most people what they think about aging, they will shrug their shoulders and say that it is a natural process. With complete tranquility on their faces, they will agree that, yes, in old age, we are haunted by many diseases, but nothing can be done about it, so it makes no sense to worry about it while you are young and healthy. Just live your life.

Then, the conversation will turn towards an even stranger direction: they will start looking for something good about aging – for example, that it ensures a change of generations, prevents society from becoming stuck in obsolete ideas, and, in general, is the engine of evolution. They’ll explain that the notion of death gives meaning to life and makes us accomplish as much as possible in the little time we have.

Continue reading “Is aging not scary? The children’s tales that are killing us” »

Jun 21, 2018

Prosthetic Memory Enhancement Is Here

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, neuroscience

This brain implant gives users prosthetic memory that can boost the brain’s short-term recall.

Read more

Jun 20, 2018

10 Charts That Will Change Your Perspective On Artificial Intelligence’s Growth

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, employment, information science, mapping, robotics/AI, security

  • There has been a 14X increase in the number of active AI startups since 2000. Crunchbase, VentureSource, and Sand Hill Econometrics were also used for completing this analysis with AI startups in Crunchbase cross-referenced to venture-backed companies in the VentureSource database. Any venture-backed companies from the Crunchbase list that were identified in the VentureSource database were included.

  • The share of jobs requiring AI skills has grown 4.5X since 2013., The growth of the share of US jobs requiring AI skills on the Indeed.com platform was calculated by first identifying AI-related jobs using titles and keywords in descriptions. Job growth is a calculated as a multiple of the share of jobs on the Indeed platform that required AI skills in the U.S. starting in January 2013. The study also calculated the growth of the share of jobs requiring AI skills on the Indeed.com platform, by country. Despite the rapid growth of the Canada and UK. AI job markets, Indeed.com reports they are respectively still 5% and 27% of the absolute size of the US AI job market.

  • Machine Learning, Deep Learning and Natural Language Processing (NLP) are the three most in-demand skills on Monster.com. Just two years ago NLP had been predicted to be the most in-demand skill for application developers creating new AI apps. In addition to skills creating AI apps, machine learning techniques, Python, Java, C++, experience with open source development environments, Spark, MATLAB, and Hadoop are the most in-demand skills. Based on an analysis of Monster.com entries as of today, the median salary is $127,000 in the U.S. for Data Scientists, Senior Data Scientists, Artificial Intelligence Consultants and Machine Learning Managers.

Continue reading “10 Charts That Will Change Your Perspective On Artificial Intelligence’s Growth” »

Jun 20, 2018

Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, health

An international team of researchers has discovered evidence of 27 previously unknown viruses in bees. The finding could help scientists design strategies to prevent the spread of viral pathogens among these important pollinators.

“Populations of bees around the world are declining, and viruses are known to contribute to these declines,” said David Galbraith, research scientist at Bristol Myers Squibb and a recent Penn State graduate. “Despite the importance of bees as pollinators of flowering plants in agricultural and natural landscapes and the importance of viruses to bee health, our understanding of bee viruses is surprisingly limited.”

To investigate viruses in bees, the team collected samples of DNA and RNA, which is responsible for the synthesis of proteins, from 12 bee species in nine countries across the world. Next, they developed a novel high-throughput sequencing technique that efficiently detected both previously identified and 27 never-seen-before viruses belonging to at least six new families in a single experiment. The results appear in the June 11, 2018, issue of Scientific Reports.

Continue reading “Scientists find evidence of 27 new viruses in bees” »

Jun 20, 2018

Aggregate form of α-synuclein leads to cell death in Parkinson’s Disease

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

An interaction between aggregate alpha synuclein and ATP synthase implicated in Parkinson’s Disease.


An open-access paper published in Nature Communications sheds light on how an accumulation of α-synuclein protein in brain cells contributes to causing Parkinson’s disease. In particular, the researchers discovered how clumps of the protein damage important proteins on mitochondrial surfaces, leading to impaired energy production, swelling and bursting of the mitochondria themselves, and, ultimately, cell death [1].

Study abstract

Continue reading “Aggregate form of α-synuclein leads to cell death in Parkinson’s Disease” »

Jun 20, 2018

Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the ‘ideal’ life

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

It seems reasonable that people would want to maximize various aspects of life if they were given the opportunity to do so, whether it’s the pleasure they feel, how intelligent they are, or how much personal freedom they have. In actuality, people around the world seem to aspire for more moderate levels of these and other traits, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

“Our research shows that people’s sense of perfection is surprisingly modest,” says psychological scientist Matthew J. Hornsey of the University of Queensland, first author on the research. “People wanted to have positive qualities, such as health and happiness, but not to the exclusion of other darker experiences—they wanted about 75% of a good thing.”

Furthermore, people said, on average, that they ideally wanted to live until they were 90 years old, which is only slightly higher than the current . Even when imagined that they could take a magic pill guaranteeing , their ideal life expectancy increased by only a few decades, to a median of 120 years old. And when people were invited to choose their ideal IQ, the median score was about 130—a score that would classify someone as smart, but not a genius.

Continue reading “Around the world, people have surprisingly modest notions of the ‘ideal’ life” »

Jun 20, 2018

The 2019 Undoing Aging Conference will take place March 28 — 30 in Berlin, Germany

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Exciting news smile


Mountain view, california / berlin, germany.

After the incredible success of the 2018 Undoing Aging Conference with 350 participants from 36 countries and over 40 brilliant speakers, SENS Research Foundation (SRF) and Forever Healthy Foundation (FHF) are pleased to announce that Undoing Aging 2019 will take place in Berlin at the Umspannwerk Alexanderplatz from March, 28 to 30.

Continue reading “The 2019 Undoing Aging Conference will take place March 28 — 30 in Berlin, Germany” »

Jun 20, 2018

5 biggest risks of sharing your DNA with consumer genetic-testing companies

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, genetics, health

Some individuals worry they will discover things about their DNA that will be frightening — namely, the risks they run of contracting various diseases — and not know how to move forward with the information. Professional scientific skeptics contend the information may not even be as accurate as claimed, and lead people to make questionable health decisions. But there’s another type of risk that consumers aren’t focusing on as much, and it’s a big one: privacy. There is nothing more private than your personal genetic information, and sending away for a personal genome kit means sharing your DNA with the testing companies. What do they do with it, beyond providing consumers with genetic and health assessments?


Consumer DNA genetic testing kits are a booming business, and the biggest risk isn’t necessarily uncovering a health scare; it’s what these companies may do, or be forced to do, with your genetic data.

Read more

Jun 19, 2018

Baby monkeys cloned successfully, humans may be next

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Meet Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, the first monkeys to ever be cloned 😱 🐵 🐵.

Read more

Jun 19, 2018

Urgent need to prepare for manmade virus attacks, says US government report

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, government

Report warns that swift progress in our ability to manufacture viruses is making us vulnerable to biological attacks.

Science editor.

Read more

Page 1 of 48112345678Last