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Archive for the ‘cybercrime/malcode’ category

Jan 21, 2020

Keeping Track of the World’s Highest-Intensity Neutrino Beam

Posted by in categories: cosmology, cybercrime/malcode, particle physics

Essentially neutrino lasers could take out missiles and also hack missiles or nukes rendering them inert in defense practices.


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Jan 20, 2020

Mitsubishi Electric data may have been compromised in cyberattack

Posted by in category: cybercrime/malcode

Major defense contractor says it suspects Chinese hacker group.

January 20, 2020 11:15 JST Updated on January 20, 2020 14:00 JST.

Jan 20, 2020

Could Scientists ‘Hack’ the Zika Virus to Kill Brain Cancer?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cybercrime/malcode, neuroscience

Could Zika be used as a cancer treatment?

Jan 19, 2020

Hacker leaks passwords for more than 500,000 servers, routers, and IoT devices

Posted by in category: cybercrime/malcode

The list was shared by the operator of a DDoS booter service.

Jan 18, 2020

Turkish Hackers Conduct Multiple Cyber-Attacks on Greek State Websites

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, finance, government


Several Greek government websites fell prey to cyber-attacks on Friday evening, forcing some of them to shut down entirely for security reasons, after access to them became problematic.

Among those attacked by hackers were the websites of the Greek Parliament, the Foreign Affairs Ministry, the Athens Stock Exchange, the National Intelligence Service (EYP) and the Finance Ministry.

A Turkish group named” Phoenix’s Helmets” (Anka Neferler Tim) posted a post on Facebook claiming responsibility for the attacks, in order to respond, as they said, to Athens’ threats against Turkey.

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Jan 18, 2020

U.S. Government Confirms Critical Browser Zero-Day Security Warning For Windows Users

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, government, privacy

It’s been a lousy week for Windows users: first, the NSA curveball crypto vulnerability and now confirmation of a zero-day vulnerability that’s being actively exploited with no fix yet.

Hot on the heels of National Security Agency (NSA) and Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) warnings for Windows 10 users to update urgently as news of the curveball crypto vulnerability broke, here we are again. The CISA has published a new warning for Windows users as Microsoft confirms a critical zero-day vulnerability is being actively exploited, and there’s no fix available at the time of writing.

Jan 18, 2020

How To Hack A Human Brain | VICE on HBO

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cybercrime/malcode, neuroscience

Advancements in neurotechnology are blurring the line between biology and technology. There is an emerging push to implant electronic devices inside the human body, hardwire them to our brains, and allow us to not only overcome disadvantages or injury but open up entirely new avenues of human experience.

VICE’s Thomas Morton got an inside look at what might be the next evolutionary step for humankind.

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Jan 18, 2020

Not sure how old this video is

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, information science, robotics/AI, virtual reality

Not sure how old this video is. But, Very impressive if it is able to grab random objects at these speeds; although i suspect it needed a lot of training before.


This handy #roboticarm can be trained to catch practically anything. 🤖 💪

Looking for a job in AI & Machine Learning. Follow us for more updates or visit: https://aijobs.com/

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Jan 18, 2020

Thousands of Chinese Students’ Data Exposed on Internet

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, education, internet, surveillance

A Chinese facial-recognition database with information on thousands of children was stored without protection on the internet, a researcher discovered, raising questions about school surveillance and cybersecurity in China.

The cache was connected to a surveillance system labeled “Safe School Shield” and contained facial-identification and location data, according to Victor Gevers, a researcher at the Dutch nonprofit GDI Foundation, which scans the internet for vulnerabilities and flags them to owners for fixing.

Jan 16, 2020

Software detects backdoor attacks on facial recognition

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, engineering, military, robotics/AI

As the U.S. Army increasingly uses facial and object recognition to train artificial intelligent systems to identify threats, the need to protect its systems from cyberattacks becomes essential.

An Army project conducted by researchers at Duke University and led by electrical and computer engineering faculty members Dr. Helen Li and Dr. Yiran Chen, made significant progress toward mitigating these types of attacks. Two members of the Duke team, Yukun Yang and Ximing Qiao, recently took first prize in the Defense category of the CSAW ‘19 HackML competition.

“Object recognition is a key component of future intelligent systems, and the Army must safeguard these systems from cyberattacks,” said MaryAnne Fields, program manager for intelligent systems at the Army Research Office. “This work will lay the foundations for recognizing and mitigating backdoor attacks in which the data used to train the system is subtly altered to give incorrect answers. Safeguarding object recognition systems will ensure that future Soldiers will have confidence in the intelligent systems they use.”

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