Blog

Archive for the ‘law’ category

Feb 9, 2019

New patent win for University of California upends CRISPR legal battle

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, law

Companies may have to license patents on genome editor from multiple places.

Read more

Feb 7, 2019

Aging and chronic diseases share genetic factors, study reveals

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, genetics, law, life extension, neuroscience

The global population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups and faces the tide of chronic diseases threatening their quality of life and posing challenges to healthcare and economy systems. To better understand the underlying biology behind healthspan — the healthy period of life before the first chronic disease manifestation — the scientists from Gero and MIPT collaborated with the researchers from PolyOmica, the University of Edinburgh and other institutes to analyze genetic data and medical histories of over 300,000 people aged 37 to 73 made available by UK Biobank.

The study published today in Communications Biology was lead by Dr. Peter Fedichev and Prof. Yurii Aulchenko. It shows that the most prevalent chronic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, dementia, and some others apparently share the common underlying mechanism that is aging itself.

«According to Gompertz mortality law, the risk of death from all causes increases exponentially after the age of 40 and doubles approximately every 8 years», explains Peter Fedichev, founder and CSO of Gero. «By analyzing the dynamics of disease incidence in the clinical data available from UKB, we observed that the risks of age-related diseases grow exponentially with age and double at a rate compatible with the Gompertz mortality law. This close relation between the most prevalent chronic diseases and mortality suggests that their risks could be driven by the same process, that is aging. This is why healthspan can be used as a natural proxy for investigation of the genetic factors controlling the rate of aging, the “holy grail” target for anti-aging interventions».

Continue reading “Aging and chronic diseases share genetic factors, study reveals” »

Feb 4, 2019

These Four Universities Are Trying to Figure Out Space Law

Posted by in categories: geopolitics, law, military, space, treaties

Jack Beard, a professor in the University of Nebraska College of Law’s Space, Cyber and Telecommunications Law Program, told Politico that the Woomera Manual on the International Law of Military Space Operations “will become the definitive document on military and security law as it applies to space.”

The Woomera Manual won’t actually lay out any new guidelines. Instead it will organize and present the laws that are already on the books so that politicians, industry leaders, and others can make better informed decisions regarding activity in space.

Given the fact that the Outer Space Treaty, which banned military actions in outer space, has all but been tossed aside, it’s unclear how much they’ll actually listen.

Continue reading “These Four Universities Are Trying to Figure Out Space Law” »

Jan 31, 2019

Against Szabo’s Law, For A New Crypto Legal System

Posted by in category: law

“For A New Crypto Legal System”


Earlier this week (on Sunday night, in fact), I came across a definition and understanding of “legal systems” that has really cleared up a lot of things that have been weighing heavily on my mind for a long time. Here it is:

Legal systems are protocols for the management of disputes.

Continue reading “Against Szabo’s Law, For A New Crypto Legal System” »

Jan 30, 2019

Brain Cancer Patient Is First to Get Untested Treatment Under Trump-Backed Law

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, law, neuroscience

‘Right to Try’ law allows patients and drugmakers to circumvent the FDA’s rules on access to experimental drugs.

Read more

Jan 30, 2019

How pharmaceutical companies game the patent system

Posted by in categories: entertainment, law

When a company reaches the top of the ladder, they typically kick it away so that others cannot climb up on it. The aim? To prevent competition. When this happens in the pharmaceutical world, in terms of patents, companies quickly apply for broad protection of their products, which can last decades, and, in doing so, they fence off entire research areas for others.

In this video, Tahir Amin an attorney Tahir Amin who specializes in patent law, explains how this “skewed” system hurts everyday people.

Read more

Jan 27, 2019

AI technology accelerates and augments legal work

Posted by in categories: law, robotics/AI

Law firms are under tremendous pressure to innovate to provide better value to their clients, who demand more value for their legal dollars. Providing higher-value services in turn boosts firms’ competitiveness.

However, much of the day-to-day work of any legal office – whether it’s in-house counsel, a boutique firm or one of the largest legal power houses – is the tedious, repetitive work of reading and preparing answers to complaints. Larger firms may have armies of junior associates do much of this necessary but mundane case-preparation work. At smaller firms, partners and senior associates are often involved in all stages of litigation. Preparing responses is time-consuming. It can take several hours to a full day to complete. Those are hours that both attorneys and firms would prefer to use tackling more strategic legal work.

We asked ourselves, what if, instead of taking hours, those high-volume, repetitive tasks could take a couple of minutes?

Continue reading “AI technology accelerates and augments legal work” »

Jan 26, 2019

​Filipino IT experts hope NASA announces Space Challenge winners as U.S. government operations resume

Posted by in categories: government, law, security, space

This is the first time that an entry from the Philippines has made it to the global finalists. http://verafiles.org/articles/filipino-it-experts-hope-nasa-…lenge-winn #SpaceApps #SpaceAppsPH


Filipino Information Technology enthusiasts are hoping that the temporary reopening of U.S. government operations after a 35-day shutdown would pave the way for the announcement of the winners in the NASA Space Apps Challenge, where one of the finalists is an app developed by a group of Filipino IT experts.

The announcement of the winners in the global competition was supposed to have been made in mid-January but has suffered a delay due to the federal government shutdown caused by a standoff over border security.

Continue reading “​Filipino IT experts hope NASA announces Space Challenge winners as U.S. government operations resume” »

Jan 19, 2019

Why it is dangerous to build ever larger big bang machines

Posted by in categories: alien life, astronomy, cosmology, energy, engineering, ethics, existential risks, general relativity, governance, gravity, innovation, law, nuclear energy, nuclear weapons, particle physics, philosophy, physics, policy, quantum physics, science, scientific freedom, security, singularity, space travel, supercomputing, theory, time travel

CERN has revealed plans for a gigantic successor of the giant atom smasher LHC, the biggest machine ever built. Particle physicists will never stop to ask for ever larger big bang machines. But where are the limits for the ordinary society concerning costs and existential risks?

CERN boffins are already conducting a mega experiment at the LHC, a 27km circular particle collider, at the cost of several billion Euros to study conditions of matter as it existed fractions of a second after the big bang and to find the smallest particle possible – but the question is how could they ever know? Now, they pretend to be a little bit upset because they could not find any particles beyond the standard model, which means something they would not expect. To achieve that, particle physicists would like to build an even larger “Future Circular Collider” (FCC) near Geneva, where CERN enjoys extraterritorial status, with a ring of 100km – for about 24 billion Euros.

Experts point out that this research could be as limitless as the universe itself. The UK’s former Chief Scientific Advisor, Prof Sir David King told BBC: “We have to draw a line somewhere otherwise we end up with a collider that is so large that it goes around the equator. And if it doesn’t end there perhaps there will be a request for one that goes to the Moon and back.”

“There is always going to be more deep physics to be conducted with larger and larger colliders. My question is to what extent will the knowledge that we already have be extended to benefit humanity?”

Continue reading “Why it is dangerous to build ever larger big bang machines” »

Jan 7, 2019

A Grindr harassment suit could change the legal landscape for tech — and free speech

Posted by in category: law

Months of harassment led Matthew Herrick to file a lawsuit against the dating app — and he’s using laws meant to protect consumers from dangerous products to do so.

Read more

Page 1 of 2912345678Last