Blog

Archive for the ‘nanotechnology’ category

Jun 21, 2018

Using Nanoscale Robots to Fight Aging and Disease

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

At least in the developed world, cancer, heart diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases are among the greatest causes of mortality. One emerging and very promising way to prevent or cure these diseases is through bio-nanotechnology.

Nanotechnology is the design, synthesis and application of materials or devices that are on the nanometer scale (one billionth of a meter). Due to the small scale of these devices, they can have many beneficial applications, both in industry and medicine. The use of nanodevices in medicine is called nanomedicine. Here, we will look at some applications of nanomedicine in curing or preventing the diseases that are most likely to kill us.

Read more

Jun 12, 2018

Space Nanodiamonds Found to Be Source of Some Cosmic Microwave Radiation

Posted by in categories: nanotechnology, space

Get the best of Smithsonian.com by email. Keep up-to-date on:

Read more

Jun 9, 2018

AI-based method could speed development of specialized nanoparticles

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

A new technique developed by MIT physicists could someday provide a way to custom-design multilayered nanoparticles with desired properties, potentially for use in displays, cloaking systems, or biomedical devices. It may also help physicists tackle a variety of thorny research problems, in ways that could in some cases be orders of magnitude faster than existing methods.

The innovation uses computational neural networks, a form of artificial intelligence, to “learn” how a nanoparticle’s structure affects its behavior, in this case the way it scatters different colors of light, based on thousands of training examples. Then, having learned the relationship, the program can essentially be run backward to design a particle with a desired set of light-scattering properties—a process called inverse design.

The findings are being reported in the journal Science Advances, in a paper by MIT senior John Peurifoy, research affiliate Yichen Shen, graduate student Li Jing, professor of physics Marin Soljacic, and five others.

Continue reading “AI-based method could speed development of specialized nanoparticles” »

Jun 4, 2018

Stronger, deeper PH-SoKor ties sought

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology, policy, robotics/AI, transportation

“This, of course, will deepen scientific and technological cooperation at the experts’ level in many areas, including but not limited to, advanced material sources. We are talking here of biotechnology, nanotechnology, data analysis, artificial intelligence, space technology, innovation policy,” Hernandez said.


By Genalyn Kabiling and Argyll Cyrus Geducos

Seoul, South Korea — The country’s vibrant relations with South Korea are expected to be strengthened with the planned cooperation accords on transportation safety, technological development, port expansion, and revitalized trade during President Duterte’s official visit.

Continue reading “Stronger, deeper PH-SoKor ties sought” »

May 30, 2018

Elon Musk Called Nanotechnology BS

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, engineering, nanotechnology, solar power, sustainability

In case you missed it, Elon Musk called BS on the field of nanotechnology last week. The ensuing Twitter spat was admittedly rather small on the grand scale of things.

But it did throw up an important question: just what is nanotech, and where does the BS end and the science begin?

I have a sneaky suspicion that Musk was trolling with his initial nano-comment. After all, much of the tech in his cars, solar cells and rockets relies on nanoscale science and engineering.

Continue reading “Elon Musk Called Nanotechnology BS” »

May 25, 2018

Nanoparticles carry drug duo into the brain to fight cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology, neuroscience

Glioblastoma is one of the most deadly forms of cancer. Affecting the brain, those unlucky enough to receive a diagnosis don’t have many treatment options – and usually a median life expectancy of just over a year. Now, researchers at MIT have developed nanoparticles that could provide hope, crossing the blood-brain barrier and delivering two types of drugs to fight tumors.

The MIT nanoparticles are liposomes, fatty droplets that can carry one drug on the inside and another in the outer layer. On the inside, the particles were loaded with a common chemotherapy drug called temozolomide, while the outer shell contained a more experimental substance known as JQ-1.

Read more

May 23, 2018

Novel organ-on-chip platform for drug screening

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, nanotechnology

Imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics and digital technologies, presents this week at its technology forum ITF 2018 (Antwerp, May 23–24), a novel organ-on-chip platform for pharmacological studies with unprecedented signal quality. It fuses imec’s high-density multi-electrode array (MEA)-chip with a microfluidic well plate, developed in collaboration with Micronit Microtechnologies, in which cells can be cultured, providing an environment that mimics human physiology. Capable of performing multiple tests in parallel, the new device aims to be a game-changer for the pharmaceutical industry, offering high quality data in the drug development process.

Every year a handful of new drugs make it to the market, but in their wake tens of thousands of candidate drugs didn’t make the cut. Nevertheless, this journey will have taken a decade and costs billions. The fact that is so time-consuming and costly, is because of the insufficiency of the existing methodologies for screening assays. These current assays are based on poor cell models that limit the quality of the resulting data, and result in inadequate biological relevance. Additionally, there is a lack of spatial resolution of the assays, resulting in the inability to screen single cells in a cell culture. Imec’s novel organ-on-chip platform aims to address these shortcomings and challenges.

Imec’s solution packs 16,384 electrodes, distributed over 16 wells, and offers multiparametric analysis. Each of the 1,024 electrodes in a well can detect intracellular action potentials, aside from the traditional extracellular signals. Further, ’s chip is patterned with microstructures to allow for a structured cell growth mimicking a specific organ.

Continue reading “Novel organ-on-chip platform for drug screening” »

May 19, 2018

Revolutionary 3D nanohybrid lithium-ion battery could allow for charging in just seconds

Posted by in categories: materials, nanotechnology

Left: Conventional composite battery design, with 2D stacked anode and cathode (black and red materials). Right: New 3D nanohybrid lithium-ion battery design, with multiple anodes and cathodes nanometers apart for high-speed charging. (credit: Cornell University)

Cornell University engineers have designed a revolutionary 3D lithium-ion battery that could be charged in just seconds.

In a conventional battery, the battery’s anode and cathode (the two sides of a battery connection) are stacked in separate columns (the black and red columns in the left illustration above). For the new design, the engineers instead used thousands of nanoscale (ultra-tiny) anodes and cathodes (shown in the illustration on the right above).

Continue reading “Revolutionary 3D nanohybrid lithium-ion battery could allow for charging in just seconds” »

May 18, 2018

Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds

Posted by in categories: energy, nanotechnology

The world is a big place, but it’s gotten smaller with the advent of technologies that put people from across the globe in the palm of one’s hand. And as the world has shrunk, it has also demanded that things happen ever faster—including the time it takes to charge an electronic device.

A cross-campus collaboration led by Ulrich Wiesner, professor of engineering in the at Cornell University, addresses this demand with a novel architecture that has the potential for lightning-quick charges.

The group’s idea: Instead of having the batteries’ anode and cathode on either side of a nonconducting separator, intertwine the components in a self-assembling, 3D gyroidal structure, with thousands of nanoscale pores filled with the elements necessary for energy storage and delivery.

Continue reading “Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds” »

May 16, 2018

Machine Learning of Human Brain

Posted by in categories: information science, nanotechnology, physics, robotics/AI

Q) Why Algorithmic leaps can be better than Hardware leaps?

Ans) Hardware constraints create bottlenecks that are hard to tackle as uncertainty of physics at small scale (nano-meters and less) come into play (electrons start jumping around).

At this point, ideas (algorithms) can be used to unleash full potential of the feasible hardware.

Continue reading “Machine Learning of Human Brain” »

Page 1 of 7112345678Last