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Archive for the ‘space’ category

Oct 11, 2018

Some Physicists Think Time May Be Slowing Down

Posted by in categories: physics, space

The universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate. At least, that’s what the vast majority of scientists would have you believe. But according to a team of Spanish physicists, it may not be the expansion of the universe that’s changing rate, but time itself. Time might be slowing down, and that means that it could eventually stop altogether.

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Oct 11, 2018

Almost like Columbia: Two crew members dodge death by an inch in botched Russian space launch

Posted by in category: space

Today’s launch abort was the first ever failure of the Soyuz FG launch vehicle, since it started in service in 2001.


A botched launch of the Russian spaceship Soyuz narrowly avoided becoming the latest fatal space incident on Thursday. Rescue systems managed to save the lives of two crew members and conduct an emergency landing.

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Oct 11, 2018

Soyuz Rocket Launch Failure Forces Emergency Landing for US-Russian Space Station Crew

Posted by in category: space

Aleksey Ovchinin and Nick Hague were scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Oct. 11, 2018.

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Oct 11, 2018

Moons can have moons and they are called moonmoons

Posted by in category: space

If a moon is big enough and far enough from its planet, it can host its own smaller moon, called a ‘moonmoon’ — and four worlds in our solar system fit the bill.

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Oct 11, 2018

Astronauts escape malfunctioning rocket

Posted by in category: space

A Russian Soyuz rocket malfunctioned during lift-off to the International Space Station.


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Oct 11, 2018

Why Futurism Has a Cultural Blindspot

Posted by in categories: futurism, space

In early 1999, during the halftime of a University of Washington basketball game, a time capsule from 1927 was opened. Among the contents of this portal to the past were some yellowing newspapers, a Mercury dime, a student handbook, and a building permit. The crowd promptly erupted into boos. One student declared the items “dumb.”

Such disappointment in time capsules seems to run endemic, suggests William E. Jarvis in his book Time Capsules: A Cultural History. A headline from The Onion, he notes, sums it up: “Newly unearthed time capsule just full of useless old crap.” Time capsules, after all, exude a kind of pathos: They show us that the future was not quite as advanced as we thought it would be, nor did it come as quickly. The past, meanwhile, turns out to not be as radically distinct as we thought.

In his book Predicting the Future, Nicholas Rescher writes that “we incline to view the future through a telescope, as it were, thereby magnifying and bringing nearer what we can manage to see.” So too do we view the past through the other end of the telescope, making things look farther away than they actually were, or losing sight of some things altogether.

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Oct 10, 2018

The Universe Has A Speed Limit, And It Isn’t The Speed Of Light

Posted by in categories: particle physics, space

Nothing can go faster than the speed of light in a vacuum. But particles in our Universe can’t even go that fast.

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Oct 9, 2018

Voyager 2 Detects Hints That Interstellar Space Is Nearby

Posted by in categories: particle physics, space

Six years ago, the Voyager 1 spacecraft informed scientists that it had become the first man-made object to enter interstellar space. Now, Voyager 2 has begun to return signs that its own exit from the Solar System could be coming soon.

Two of Voyager 2’s instruments have measured an increase in the number of high-energy particles called cosmic rays hitting the spacecraft, according to a NASA release. Scientists think that the heliosphere, the region of particles and magnetic fields under the Sun’s influence, blocks some cosmic rays. An increase in their rate means that the probe could be nearing the heliopause, the heliosphere’s outer boundary.

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Oct 7, 2018

Astronomers Are Getting Excited Over Ghostly Traces of a Massive Cosmic Explosion

Posted by in categories: law, space

A comparison of surveys taken of the sky years apart has revealed an empty space where a star 280 million light years away once sat.

Coded FIRST J1419+3940, records of the object hint at what would have been a violent death. Curiously, no trace of its final explosive moments can be found – but this ghostly silence has only made astronomers all the more excited.

“We compared images from old maps of the sky and found one radio source that was no longer visible today in the Very Large Array Sky Survey (VLASS),” says astronomer Casey Law from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Oct 6, 2018

The space race on steroids: Fight to get off Earth is more competitive than ever

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Billionaires and political leaders are vying to land on the Moon, colonize Mars or mine asteroids.

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