Blog

Archive for the ‘food’ category

Aug 17, 2018

The Dark Secret These Corporations Are Hiding From You

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, food, neuroscience

This is a must watch video. It tells a painful truth of our real world. It is worth the watch. Please pass this video along if you are so inclined.


Excerpt: You live in a world of drug dealers. Only the drugs can be bought legally, and are perfectly priced to prevent you from inquiring into other areas. Your society exhibits a wealth of negative side effects from these drugs. Yet the bulk of your population still continues to use our products, even after they’ve shown themselves to be harmful. You live in a population that continues to grow more restless, agitated, and depressed, in part from eating our goodies and treats. Treats that are called “superstimuli” as the stimulus it produces inside your brain vastly exceeds the natural stimuli humans received throughout evolution, from natural foods.

Continue reading “The Dark Secret These Corporations Are Hiding From You” »

Aug 17, 2018

Global study shows environmentally friendly farming can increase productivity

Posted by in categories: food, sustainability

A major new study involving researchers from the University of York has measured a global shift towards more sustainable agricultural systems that provide environmental improvements at the same time as increases in food production.

The study shows that the sustainable intensification of agriculture, a term that was once considered paradoxical, delivers considerable benefits to both farmers and the environment.

The study, published in the leading journal Nature Sustainability, involved researchers from 17 universities and research institutes in the UK, USA, Sweden, Ethiopia and New Zealand.

Continue reading “Global study shows environmentally friendly farming can increase productivity” »

Aug 17, 2018

The plastic waste crisis is an opportunity for the U.S. to get serious about recycling at home

Posted by in categories: food, health, policy, sustainability

A global plastic waste crisis is building, with major implications for health and the environment. Under its so-called “National Sword” policy, China has sharply reduced imports of foreign scrap materials. As a result, piles of plastic waste are building up in ports and recycling facilities across the United States.

In response, support is growing nationally and worldwide for banning or restricting single-use consumer plastics, such as straws and grocery bags. These efforts are also spurred by chilling findings about how micro-plastics travel through oceans and waterways and up the food chain.

Continue reading “The plastic waste crisis is an opportunity for the U.S. to get serious about recycling at home” »

Aug 16, 2018

Wheat gene map to help ‘feed the world’

Posted by in category: food

Researchers are set to develop higher yield wheat varieties requiring less water after making a gene map.

Read more

Aug 16, 2018

Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics, study finds

Posted by in categories: economics, engineering, food, sustainability

It may seem off-putting to some, but human waste is full of nutrients that can be recycled into valuable products that could promote agricultural sustainability and better economic independence for some developing countries.

Cities produce and must manage huge quantities of . Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a model to clarify what parts of the world may benefit most from re-circulation of human-waste-derived nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus from cities and back into farm fields. They report their findings in the journal Nature Sustainability.

“We grow our in the field, apply nutrient-rich fertilizers, eat the crops, excrete all of the nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and then those nutrients end up at the ,” said Jeremy Guest, a civil and environmental engineering professor and study co-author. “It is a very linear, one-directional flow of resources. Engineering a more circular nutrient cycle would create opportunities that could benefit the environment, economy and agriculture.”

Continue reading “Human wastewater valuable to global agriculture, economics, study finds” »

Aug 16, 2018

A way to get green revolution crops to be productive without needing so much nitrogen

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, food, genetics

A team of researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences in China and the University of Oxford in the U.K. has found a way to grow green revolution crops using less nitrogen with no reduction in yield. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their research efforts and the results they found when planting newly developed plant varieties. Fanmiao Wang and Makoto Matsuoka with Nagoya University offer a News & Views piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue.

The green revolution was characterized by big increases in crop production in developing countries—it came about due to the increased use of pesticides, fertilizers and changes in crop varieties used. One of the changes to the crops came about as and wheat plants were bred to grow less tall to prevent damage from wind and rain. While this resulted in improved yields, it also resulted in the use of more nitrogen-based fertilizers, which are environmentally harmful. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if it might be possible to re-engineer green-revolution crop varieties in such a way as to restrict height and therefore retain high productivity, while also using nitrogen more efficiently.

Prior research had shown that proteins in the DELLA family reduced plant growth. Crop breeding in the 1960s led to varieties of rice and wheat with genetic mutations that allowed the proteins to build up in the plants, thus stunting their growth. Unfortunately, DELLA proteins have also been found to be the cause of inefficient nitrogen use in the same —as a result, farmers used more of it to increase yields. To overcome this problem, the researchers crossbred varieties of rice to learn more, and found that the transcription factor OsGRF4 was associated with nitrogen uptake. Using that information, they engineered some varieties of rice to express OsGRF4 at higher levels, which, when tested, showed higher uptake of nitrogen. The team then planted the varieties they had engineered and found that they required less nitrogen to produce the same yields—and they were just as stunted. They therefore claim that it is possible to grow that require less .

Continue reading “A way to get green revolution crops to be productive without needing so much nitrogen” »

Aug 15, 2018

I almost died from a leading American killer: Choking on food

Posted by in categories: business, education, food, transhumanism

I have a very important and scary story to share I wrote. Give it a read. It’s published the Napa Valley Register (the main paper of a community where my wine business is newly located). The article is about one of the most common and unexpected ways people around the world die. I almost did.


I recently completed a European speaking tour discussing transhumanism, a social movement whose primary goal is to live as long as possible through science.

Ironically, I’ll probably remember the month-long tour most for a specific 60 seconds—when I almost choked to death on thick, leathery bread in a German restaurant. This may be surprising, but the fourth-leading cause of unintentional death in America is asphyxiation from choking on food, according to the National Safety Council.

Continue reading “I almost died from a leading American killer: Choking on food” »

Aug 15, 2018

European aquaculture to benefit from a better quality of live feed

Posted by in categories: employment, food, sustainability

The aquaculture sector is growing, with fish farming being a key way to ensure Europe gets the quality food it needs without exploiting marine resources further. One key problem the industry faces is how to get the immature fish though their first few months – one EU project may be about to smooth the way.

Aquaculture is a growing market within the EU, bringing employment and providing a sustainable source of fish at a time when our marine life is under pressure. The main bottle-neck for the production of marine fish is the juvenile phase, especially during the time in which live diets are used. Even the established species, sea bream and sea bass, have a very low survival rate with an average of 25 percent. For new species in aquaculture, such as amberjack and tuna, the mortality is even higher.

The natural first feed for most is crustacean nauplii, the offspring of many types of crustacean zooplankton. Fish larvae is evolutionary adapted to such a diet, and it is believed that this type of prey fulfils the fish larva’s nutritional requirements.

Continue reading “European aquaculture to benefit from a better quality of live feed” »

Aug 15, 2018

How to conserve half the planet without going hungry

Posted by in categories: existential risks, food, habitats

‚Every day there are roughly 386,000 new mouths to feed, and in that same 24 hours, scientists estimate between one and 100 species will go extinct. That’s it. Lost forever.

To deal with the biodiversity crisis we need to find a way to give nature more space—habitat loss is a key factor driving these extinctions. But how would this affect our food supplies?

New research, published in Nature Sustainability, found it could mean we lose a lot of food —but exactly how much really depends on how we choose to give nature that space. Doing it right could mean rethinking how we do agriculture and altogether.

Continue reading “How to conserve half the planet without going hungry” »

Aug 12, 2018

The food delivery robots hitting a sidewalk near you

Posted by in categories: food, robotics/AI

They’re based in Berkeley but spreading across the country.

Read more

Page 1 of 7012345678Last