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Archive for the ‘security’ category

Nov 10, 2018

Scientists to create ‘truly unhackable’ network based on quantum physics

Posted by in categories: computing, internet, quantum physics, security

Scientists are planning to create a network in the Chicago area tapping the principles of quantum physics. The idea is to prove that quantum physics could provide the basis for an unhackable internet.

This, they say, could have wide-ranging impact on communications, computing and national security.

The quantum network development, supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), will stretch between the DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory and Fermi National Acceleratory Laboratory, a connection that is said will be the longest in the world to send secure information using quantum physics.

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Oct 29, 2018

T-Mobile becomes 1st U.S. wireless company to carry the new 6T ‘superphone’ from China’s OnePlus

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, security

T-Mobile will carry the new OnePlus 6T, the first time a phone from the popular Chinese manufacturer has been offered by a U.S. wireless provider.

The 6T launches exclusively on T-Mobile starting Thursday, the company said during an unveiling event in New York City. But the company is offering an early sale at its Times Square store in New York City starting at 5 p.m. Eastern today.

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Oct 25, 2018

China: facial recognition and state control | The Economist

Posted by in categories: government, privacy, robotics/AI, security, surveillance, transportation

Whether it’s left there or right here… the tactics and destination look pretty much the same to me…


China is the world leader in facial recognition technology. Discover how the country is using it to develop a vast hyper-surveillance system able to monitor and target its ethnic minorities, including the Muslim Uighur population.

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Oct 24, 2018

New CRISPR tool opens up more of the genome for editing

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, security

The genome editing system CRISPR has become a hugely important tool in medical research, and could ultimately have a significant impact in fields such as agriculture, bioenergy, and food security.

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Oct 23, 2018

Here’s what the quantum internet has in store

Posted by in categories: internet, quantum physics, security

A future ‘quantum internet’ could find use long before it reaches technological maturity, a team of physicists predicts.

Such a network, which exploits the unique effects of quantum physics, would be fundamentally different to the classical Internet we use today, and research groups worldwide are already working on its early stages of development. The first stages promise virtually unbreakable privacy and security in communications; a more mature network could include a range of applications for science and beyond that aren’t possible with classical systems, including quantum sensors that can detect gravitational waves.

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Oct 21, 2018

The Next Tech Talent Shortage: Quantum Computing Researchers

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, security

By some estimates, only 1,000 or so researchers can claim to understand the technology. Finding more could become a national security issue.

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Oct 18, 2018

Crypto Quantique claims launch of first quantum-driven secure chip on silicon to strengthen IoT security

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, robotics/AI, security

UK-based Crypto Quantique has announced the launch of what is being claimed as the world’s most advanced security product for IoT devices – with a quantum edge.

The technology behind this solution includes world’s first quantum driven secure chip (QDSC) on silicon which, when combined with cryptographic APIs, provides highly scalable, easy-to-implement and seamless end-to-end security for any connected device.

Quantum computing differs from classical computing in that it has the potential to find patterns and insights based on data which does not exist, rather than finding patterns in vast amounts of existing data. Its potential applications include improving security through quantum physics and enhancements to machine learning and artificial intelligence.

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Oct 10, 2018

Air Force awards launch vehicle development contracts to Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman, ULA

Posted by in categories: security, space travel

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force announced on Wednesday it is awarding three contracts collectively worth about $2 billion to Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems and United Launch Alliance to develop launch system prototypes.

The funding is for the development of competing launch system prototypes geared toward launching national security payloads. Each company will receive an initial award of $181 million.

The Launch Service Agreements are for the development of Blue Origin’s New Glenn, Northrop Grumman’s Omega and ULA’s Vulcan Centaur rockets. The awards are part of cost-sharing arrangements — known as Other Transaction Agreements — that the Air Force is signing with the three companies to ensure it has multiple competitors. The Air Force has committed through 2024 a total of $500 million in OTA funds for Blue Origin, $792 million for Northrop Grumman and $967 million for ULA. SpaceX previously received an LSA award but did not make the cut this time.

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Oct 8, 2018

Engineers build smallest integrated Kerr frequency comb generator

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, computing, engineering, security

Optical frequency combs can enable ultrafast processes in physics, biology, and chemistry, as well as improve communication and navigation, medical testing, and security. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2005 was awarded to the developers of laser-based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique, and microresonator combs have become an intense focus of research over the past decade.

A major challenge has been how to make such comb sources smaller and more robust and portable. In the past 10 years, major advances have been made in the use of monolithic, chip-based microresonators to produce such combs. While the microresonators generating the are tiny—smaller than a human hair—they have always relied on external lasers that are often much larger, expensive, and power-hungry.

Researchers at Columbia Engineering announced today in Nature that they have built a Kerr frequency comb generator that, for the first time, integrates the together with the , significantly shrinking the system’s size and power requirements. They designed the laser so that half of the laser cavity is based on a semiconductor waveguide section with high optical gain, while the other half is based on waveguides, made of , a very low-loss material. Their results showed that they no longer need to connect separate devices in the lab using fiber—they can now integrate it all on photonic chips that are compact and energy efficient.

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Sep 13, 2018

NASA picked this West African country to find out more about an asteroid in outer space

Posted by in categories: security, space

A few factors were taken into consideration. These included security conditions, climatic conditions at that time of year, the existence of potential scientific partners, and what facilities were available.

Senegal has made great strides in astronomy and planetary sciences in recent years. That’s been largely driven by the Senegalese Association for the Promotion of Astronomy, led by Maram Kaire. Some Senegalese researchers are also involved in the African Initiative for Planetary and Space Sciences, which I head up.

And so, NASA focused its efforts in Senegal. It sent 21 teams to the country, and six to Columbia, which had less favorable climatic conditions. One team, composed of Algerian astronomers from the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique et Géophysique, also attempted to observe the occultation in the south of Algeria.

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