Blog

Archive for the ‘security’ category

Oct 10, 2018

Air Force awards launch vehicle development contracts to Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman, ULA

Posted by in categories: security, space travel

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force announced on Wednesday it is awarding three contracts collectively worth about $2 billion to Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman Innovation Systems and United Launch Alliance to develop launch system prototypes.

The funding is for the development of competing launch system prototypes geared toward launching national security payloads. Each company will receive an initial award of $181 million.

The Launch Service Agreements are for the development of Blue Origin’s New Glenn, Northrop Grumman’s Omega and ULA’s Vulcan Centaur rockets. The awards are part of cost-sharing arrangements — known as Other Transaction Agreements — that the Air Force is signing with the three companies to ensure it has multiple competitors. The Air Force has committed through 2024 a total of $500 million in OTA funds for Blue Origin, $792 million for Northrop Grumman and $967 million for ULA. SpaceX previously received an LSA award but did not make the cut this time.

Continue reading “Air Force awards launch vehicle development contracts to Blue Origin, Northrop Grumman, ULA” »

Oct 8, 2018

Engineers build smallest integrated Kerr frequency comb generator

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, computing, engineering, security

Optical frequency combs can enable ultrafast processes in physics, biology, and chemistry, as well as improve communication and navigation, medical testing, and security. The Nobel Prize in Physics 2005 was awarded to the developers of laser-based precision spectroscopy, including the optical frequency comb technique, and microresonator combs have become an intense focus of research over the past decade.

A major challenge has been how to make such comb sources smaller and more robust and portable. In the past 10 years, major advances have been made in the use of monolithic, chip-based microresonators to produce such combs. While the microresonators generating the are tiny—smaller than a human hair—they have always relied on external lasers that are often much larger, expensive, and power-hungry.

Researchers at Columbia Engineering announced today in Nature that they have built a Kerr frequency comb generator that, for the first time, integrates the together with the , significantly shrinking the system’s size and power requirements. They designed the laser so that half of the laser cavity is based on a semiconductor waveguide section with high optical gain, while the other half is based on waveguides, made of , a very low-loss material. Their results showed that they no longer need to connect separate devices in the lab using fiber—they can now integrate it all on photonic chips that are compact and energy efficient.

Continue reading “Engineers build smallest integrated Kerr frequency comb generator” »

Sep 13, 2018

NASA picked this West African country to find out more about an asteroid in outer space

Posted by in categories: security, space

A few factors were taken into consideration. These included security conditions, climatic conditions at that time of year, the existence of potential scientific partners, and what facilities were available.

Senegal has made great strides in astronomy and planetary sciences in recent years. That’s been largely driven by the Senegalese Association for the Promotion of Astronomy, led by Maram Kaire. Some Senegalese researchers are also involved in the African Initiative for Planetary and Space Sciences, which I head up.

And so, NASA focused its efforts in Senegal. It sent 21 teams to the country, and six to Columbia, which had less favorable climatic conditions. One team, composed of Algerian astronomers from the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique et Géophysique, also attempted to observe the occultation in the south of Algeria.

Continue reading “NASA picked this West African country to find out more about an asteroid in outer space” »

Sep 7, 2018

Quantum cryptography: A foolproof method of preserving data security

Posted by in categories: economics, encryption, quantum physics, security, sustainability

Investment in clean energy is rising as improved economics and energy storage, better regulation, and concerns about air pollution drive the creation of innovative new solutions.

Read more

Sep 7, 2018

Why Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Are A National Security Risk And Also An Opportunity For Progress

Posted by in categories: education, government, security

A career’s worth of intelligence work for the U.S. Government has taught me one key lesson: national security is a lot like playing a game of chess. You have to anticipate your opponent’s every move in order to remain one step ahead.

Disclosing your strategy will be used against you. But if you recognize certain opportunities, you can win the match.

When I headed the government’s highly sensitive Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP), I worked with a team to assess whether a particular chess piece — in this case in the form of an unfamiliar aerial technology — was a threat to our side of the chess board.

Continue reading “Why Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Are A National Security Risk And Also An Opportunity For Progress” »

Sep 6, 2018

Baidu has created a ‘no code’ platform to make building AI models easier

Posted by in categories: business, internet, robotics/AI, security

Hoping to make up ground in the hotly contested artificial intelligence battleground, Chinese Internet giant Baidu Inc. is releasing a tool that allows businesses to create and deploy AI models without coding skills.

Announced Saturday, EZDL is a “no-code platform to build custom machine learning models,” designed with ease of use and security in mind, the company said.

Continue reading “Baidu has created a ‘no code’ platform to make building AI models easier” »

Aug 30, 2018

Google Titan Security Key Kit Now on Sale for $50

Posted by in category: security

Starting today, Google’s Titan Security Keys are now on sale via the Google Store for $50. The kit provides buyers with two security keys, one of which can act as a backup, in case you lose the other.

Titan Security Keys look and function like any other security keys on the market, so don’t expect anything game-changing. But Google’s keys can help you protect your Google, Facebook, or Dropbox accounts from sophisticated phishing attacks.

A security key is a device that essentially adds another step to the account sign-in process. To break in, a hacker would need your password and the physical key, which can sign a digital authentication request to unlock your account.

Continue reading “Google Titan Security Key Kit Now on Sale for $50” »

Aug 26, 2018

Insecure Medical Devices Are Low-Hanging Fruit for Hackers

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, health, security

“The big problem is that hospitals don’t buy new devices, and they keep using really dangerous ones ad infinitum — until they just stop working,” Corman said.

Corman wants these old, unsecured devices gone from hospitals. The fear is that, beyond freezing systems or hijacking medical records as they did during WannaCry, hackers could also actively manipulate medical equipment to harm patients by, say, administering a lethal dose of medication via an infusion pump. While newer devices aren’t ironclad, they are typically built with more robust security features. So Corman and others are urging health-care providers to scrap old, or “legacy,” equipment and replace it with newer models.

To nudge health-care providers to trade up, he’s put forth an idea for an incentive program akin to “Cash for Clunkers,” the 2009 federal auto-rebate plan that aimed to run gas-guzzling cars off the road. Under that program, which was formally called the Car Allowance Rebate System, people received cash in exchange for turning in fuel-inefficient vehicles, which they could then put toward new, more efficient ones. (The program fizzled after a few months, when it depleted its allotted budget.) Similarly, in this version, health-care providers would be compensated for junking old equipment, and could use the rebates toward the purchase of new devices. Corman said he hasn’t fully worked out the economics, but he believes device makers might be willing to subsidize the program in part, since it would help them move inventory.

Continue reading “Insecure Medical Devices Are Low-Hanging Fruit for Hackers” »

Aug 16, 2018

Hologram Computers

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, augmented reality, biotech/medical, entertainment, holograms, quantum physics, robotics/AI, science, security, space travel, virtual reality, wearables

Computing innovation, computer-generated images, Virtual Reality Glasses, Hybrid Reality, communications, Holographic platform, AR, VR, PC, lifelike experience, 3D cameras, cosmic computing, computer security, gaming displays, in-flight entertainment, computer code, Holographic ideal/paradigm, gaming mechanics, automotive, medical, space, spatial, holographic memory, Artificial Neural Networks, Robotics, holographic 3D, software company, mixed-realty, holographic data, hologram monitors, hologram keyboards, voice equipment, projector system, Holographic apps, HD photography, smartphones, tablets, TVs, laptops, digital displays, 360 Video, Virtual Realty Headsets, Mobile Platforms, holographic universe, ubiquitous computing paradigm, virtual images, Holoquad, Holographic Projector Pyramid, cloud computing, spaceships, teleportation, anti-gravity devices, emulation, advanced technology, light field displays, Mobile Hologram Technology, computer programs, untethered, Immersive Technology, Computer Chips, Elohim computer, custom software, mobile application development, computing library, human-computer interactions, Artificial Neural Networks, holographic memory, Spider-Robots, pop-up gaming displays, automate machinery, computer-generated simulation, 3D Pyramid, consumer electronics, personal computers, holographic images, real-world objects, hardware interconnection, missionary, virtual assistant, Computer Systems Structure, two-dimensional computer display, computerization, Projection Screen, Portable, 3D printer, Hologram goggles, 3D Holographic Projection Technology, Hologram Computer Table, hologram generator, multilevel computer, mixed reality, Bluetooth enabled, Virtual Reality Display, transparent screen display, quantum computer, computer animation, 3D plasma display, meta surface, Dark Energy, holographic interferograms, photorefractive, Holographic atomic memory, computer-generated hologram, real-time hologram, x-ray mirror mandrels, virtual wavefront recording plane, Artificial intelligence, AI, Human Resources, Advertising, Animation, Graphic Web Design, Photography, Robotics, computer science, human-robot interaction, Emergency Medical Hologram, wearable computing, bio-computing, battlefield simulations, Holographic Associative Memory, artificial neural network, Digital Avatar.

Read more

Aug 7, 2018

NEC unveils facial recognition system for 2020 Tokyo Olympics

Posted by in categories: entertainment, privacy, robotics/AI, security

NEC has announced that it will be providing a large-scale facial recognition system for the 2020 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Tokyo. The system will be used to identify over 300,000 people at the Games, including athletes, volunteers, media, and other staff. It’s the first time that facial recognition technology will ever be used for this purpose at an Olympic Games.

NEC’s system is built around an AI engine called NeoFace, which is part of the company’s overarching Bio-IDiom line of biometric authentication technology. The Tokyo 2020 implementation will involve linking photo data with an IC card to be carried by accredited people. NEC says that it has the world’s leading face recognition tech based on benchmark tests from the US’ National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Read more

Page 1 of 4612345678Last