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Archive for the ‘education’ category

Aug 10, 2022

An American non-profit organization built the first 3D-printed school in Madagascar

Posted by in categories: education, sustainability

Thinking Huts intends to increase access to education.

Maggie Grout, who was born in a rural mountain village in China, was adopted rather young. “And I think that largely shaped my outlook through the rest of my life — knowing what poverty looks like, and how it impacts the opportunities you’re able to achieve in life. Having that allowed me to see more clearly what my purpose was in life — helping children gain access to education in underprivileged areas in the world,” she tells *IE* in an interview. Huts rely on additive manufacturing technologies to build sustainable schools. Recently, they built the first 3D-printed school in Madagascar.

Aug 9, 2022

Digital security dialogue: Leveraging human verification to educate people about online safety

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, ethics, internet, security

Online safety and ethics are serious issues and can adversely affect less experienced users. Researchers have built upon familiar human verification techniques to add an element of discrete learning into the process. This way users can learn about online safety and ethics issues while simultaneously verifying they are human. Trials show that users responded positively to the experience and felt they gained something from these microlearning sessions.

The internet is an integral part of modern living, for work, leisure, shopping, keeping touch with people, and more. It’s hard to imagine that anyone could live in an affluent country, such as Japan, and not use the internet relatively often. Yet despite its ubiquity, the internet is far from risk-free. Issues of safety and security are of great concern, especially for those with less exposure to such things. So a team of researchers from the University of Tokyo including Associate Professor Koji Yatani of the Department for Electrical Engineering and Information Systems set out to help.

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Aug 5, 2022

Will a robot take my job? | The Age of A.I.

Posted by in categories: education, employment, robotics/AI

The fear of losing jobs to computers is a common one among millions of people, and one that many have seen happen in their lifetime. But A.I. has the potential to allow many jobs to evolve, to become safer, more efficient and better for society as a whole.

The Age of A.I. is a 8 part documentary series hosted by Robert Downey Jr. covering the ways Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Neural Networks will change the world.

Continue reading “Will a robot take my job? | The Age of A.I.” »

Aug 5, 2022

Saving the world one algorithm at a time | The Age of A.I.

Posted by in categories: education, existential risks, food, information science, robotics/AI

Many say that human beings have destroyed our planet. Because of this these people are endeavoring to save it through the help of artificial intelligence. Famine, animal extinction, and war may all be preventable one day with the help of technology.

The Age of A.I. is a 8 part documentary series hosted by Robert Downey Jr. covering the ways Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Neural Networks will change the world.

Continue reading “Saving the world one algorithm at a time | The Age of A.I.” »

Aug 4, 2022

TOP 5 Longevity Startups. Who Will Make Us Immortal?

Posted by in categories: economics, education, life extension

I don’t buy the Jeanne Calment story.


How can we live longer and be healthier? These startups are trying to extend our lives.
✱ Download the Dizraptor app to invest in technologies of the future https://dizraptor.onelink.me/1kIK/samumed.

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Aug 4, 2022

New algorithm aces university math course questions

Posted by in categories: education, information science, mathematics, robotics/AI

Multivariable calculus, differential equations, linear algebra—topics that many MIT students can ace without breaking a sweat—have consistently stumped machine learning models. The best models have only been able to answer elementary or high school-level math questions, and they don’t always find the correct solutions.

Now, a multidisciplinary team of researchers from MIT and elsewhere, led by Iddo Drori, a lecturer in the MIT Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS), has used a to solve university-level math problems in a few seconds at a human level.

The model also automatically explains solutions and rapidly generates new problems in university math subjects. When the researchers showed these machine-generated questions to , the students were unable to tell whether the questions were generated by an algorithm or a human.

Aug 3, 2022

The serotonin theory of depression: a systematic umbrella review of the evidence

Posted by in categories: education, genetics, health, neuroscience

In order to cover the different areas and to manage the large volume of research that has been conducted on the serotonin system, we conducted an ‘umbrella’ review. Umbrella reviews survey existing systematic reviews and meta-analyses relevant to a research question and represent one of the highest levels of evidence synthesis available [23]. Although they are traditionally restricted to systematic reviews and meta-analyses, we aimed to identify the best evidence available. Therefore, we also included some large studies that combined data from individual studies but did not employ conventional systematic review methods, and one large genetic study. The latter used nationwide databases to capture more individuals than entire meta-analyses, so is likely to provide even more reliable evidence than syntheses of individual studies.

We first conducted a scoping review to identify areas of research consistently held to provide support for the serotonin hypothesis of depression. Six areas were identified, addressing the following questions: Serotonin and the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA–whether there are lower levels of serotonin and 5-HIAA in body fluids in depression; Receptors — whether serotonin receptor levels are altered in people with depression; The serotonin transporter (SERT) — whether there are higher levels of the serotonin transporter in people with depression (which would lower synaptic levels of serotonin); Depletion studies — whether tryptophan depletion (which lowers available serotonin) can induce depression; SERT gene – whether there are higher levels of the serotonin transporter gene in people with depression; Whether there is an interaction between the SERT gene and stress in depression.

We searched for systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and large database studies in these six areas in PubMed, EMBASE and PsycINFO using the Healthcare Databases Advanced Search tool provided by Health Education England and NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence). Searches were conducted until December 2020.

Aug 3, 2022

Traffic Noise Can Slow Cognitive Development

Posted by in categories: education, health, neuroscience

However, the research which was published in PLoS Medicine found that noise levels in the house had no effect on the results of working memory and attention tests.

Road traffic noise is a common issue in cities, but its effects on children’s health are still not fully known. According to recent research done at 38 schools in Barcelona, road noise has a negative impact on how well working memory and attention are developed in young children. The results of this investigation, which was conducted under the direction of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a facility supported by the “la Caixa” Foundation, were released in the journal PLoS Medicine.

2,680 kids between the ages of 7 and 10 participated in the study, which was part of the BREATHE initiative and directed by researchers Maria Foraster and Jordi Sunyer. The researchers focused on attention and working memory, two skills that grow quickly throughout preadolescence and are crucial for learning and academic success, in order to gauge the potential effects of traffic noise on cognitive development.

Aug 3, 2022

The Kardashev Scale Type I, II, III, IV & V Civilization — Documentary

Posted by in categories: education, energy

We have reached a turning point in society. According to renowned theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, the next 100 years of science will determine whether we perish or thrive. Will we remain a Type 0 civilization, or will we advance and make our way into the stars?

Experts assert that, as a civilization grows larger and becomes more advanced, its energy demands will increase rapidly due to its population growth and the energy requirements of its various machines. With this in mind, the Kardashev scale was developed as a way of measuring a civilization’s technological advancement based upon how much usable energy it has at its disposal (this was originally just tied to energy available for communications, but has since been expanded).

Aug 3, 2022

Augmented reality could be the future of paper books, according to new research

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, education, energy

“Augmented books, or a-books, can be the future of many book genres, from travel and tourism to education. This technology exists to assist the reader in a deeper understanding of the written topic and get more through digital means without ruining the experience of reading a paper book.”

Power efficiency and pre-printed conductive paper are some of the new features which allow Surrey’s augmented books to now be manufactured on a semi-industrial scale. With no wiring visible to the reader, Surrey’s augmented reality books allow users to trigger with a simple gesture (such as a swipe of a finger or turn of a page), which will then be displayed on a nearby device.

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