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Archive for the ‘education’ category

Jun 14, 2018

Why a 19-year-old Bitcoin millionaire built a working Dr. Octopus suit

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, bitcoin, cyborgs, education

What would you do if you were a 19-year-old kid with $3.3 million? There are few people more equipped to answer that than teenaged bitcoin millionaire Erik Finman. His answer? You use some of that cash to build a Doctor Octopus-style exosuit and try and shake up the education system.

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Jun 5, 2018

Bioquark Inc. — Free Your Mind Podcast — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, biotech/medical, business, DNA, education, finance, futurism, health, life extension, neuroscience

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/entrepreneursempower/2018/06/03…ira-pastor

May 28, 2018

Scientists invented a real-life flux capacitor, but not for time travel

Posted by in categories: education, time travel

If you watched Back to the Future over the holiday weekend and wished the flux capacitor was a real thing so you could travel through time, we have sorta good news. Scientists from Australia and Switzerland have proposed a real-life flux capacitor — but you won’t be able to travel back to a high school dance in the ’50s with it.

The device is a new type of electronic circulator, which can control the directional movement of microwave signals. The scientists, who published their research in Physical Review Letters, have proposed two different potential circuits — one of them borrows the design of the three-pointed flux capacitor Doc Brown and Marty McFly used to travel to 1955 and 2015 in their DeLorean.

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May 26, 2018

Epigenetic clock analysis of diet, exercise, education, and lifestyle factors

Posted by in categories: education, genetics, life extension

Aging (Albany NY). 2017 Feb 14;9:419–446. doi: 10.18632/aging.101168.

Quach A, Levine ME, Tanaka T, Lu AT, Chen BH, Ferrucci L, Ritz B3 Bandinelli S, Neuhouser ML, Beasley JM, Snetselaar L, Wallace RB, Tsao PS9,10, Absher D11, Assimes TL, Stewart JD12, Li Y13,14, Hou L15,16, Baccarelli AA17, Whitsel EA12,18, Horvath S1,19.

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May 21, 2018

A little-known feature in Google Maps lets you explore our local solar system — here’s how to visit Mercury, Venus, and other planets and moons in Google Maps

Posted by in categories: education, space

Most people just use Google Maps to get directions from A to B, but it’s also an incredible educational tool in its own right.

Using Google Maps is a great way to learn more about the various cities and countries around the world. But many people might not know that Google Maps can also be used to explore other worlds besides Earth.

That’s right: If you visit Google Maps and zoom out far enough, you’ll have the option to explore several planets and moons in our own solar system.

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May 18, 2018

Florida man tests world’s first fully mind-controlled artificial arm

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, education, habitats

He now officially owns them! #CyborgsRule


— Johnny Metheny sits at an electric piano in his Port Richey home self-teaching himself the song Amazing Grace. Johnny’s never played before, but he’s determined to master the song. He plays through fairly well with his right hand.

“That side I got down pretty good,” said Metheny.

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May 12, 2018

Time to break open AI’s black box, and keep it open

Posted by in categories: education, finance, robotics/AI

At the same time, the data that feeds AI decisions needs to be carefully vetted and reviewed. For example, “a robotic process automation solution that automates a loan process so the bank can deliver the loan faster to a client would be great,” according to Aditya Bhasin, head of consumer and wealth management technology at Bank of America, also quoted in American Banker. “But using AI or robotic process automation as a shortcut to data integration might not make sense. For example, when BofA launched a digital mortgage, ‘we could have done a whole bunch of robotics to go and pull data from different places and prepopulate the mortgage application, [but] it probably would have been fraught with error,” he said.

Too many organizations are rushing into AI without considering the full implications of the people element, according to Bessant. “It is time that we re-balance the discussion from being driven by the creators and the sellers of artificial intelligence to being balanced with the user perspective,” she says. “The discussion has been dominated by the sellers. Flip on any one of the morning financial shows and what you see is advertisement after advertisement for large and small-scale technology firms that are pushing the notion of data and modeling and that AI will help. Generally, society seems sold that artificial intelligence is better than we are as humans. However, because we build it, it is a subset of who we are and our thinking and bias.”

There’s a lot of buzz, and a lot of money now pouring into AIt’s important that some of that attention and money goes into education and building awareness of the processes behind the processes.

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May 11, 2018

Six tips for social-emotional learning (SEL) to transfer into real-world skills

Posted by in category: education

Great suggestions for educators who want to implement SEL and mindfulness more effectively in their classrooms.


___ Social-emotional learning (SEL) teaches the key attitudes and skills necessary for understanding and managing emotions, listening, feeling and showing empathy for others, and making thoughtful, responsible decisions. For five years, I was an educator in the field teaching mindfulness and emotional skills to.

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May 9, 2018

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is Here!

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, education, employment, government, information science, law, mathematics, robotics/AI

So much talk about AI and robots taking our jobs. Well, guess what, it’s already happening and the rate of change will only increase. I estimate that about 5% of jobs have been automated — both blue collar manufacturing jobs, as well as, this time, low-level white collar jobs — think back office, paralegals, etc. There’s a thing called RPA, or Robot Process Automation, which is hollowing out back office jobs at an alarming rate, using rules based algorithms and expert systems. This will rapidly change with the introduction of deep learning algorithms into these “robot automation” systems, making them intelligent, capable of making intuitive decisions and therefore replacing more highly skilled and creative jobs. So if we’re on an exponential curve, and we’ve managed to automate around 5% of jobs in the past six years, say, and the doubling is every two years, that means by 2030, almost all jobs will be automated. Remember, the exponential math means 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 100%, with the doubling every two years.

We are definitely going to need a basic income to prevent people (doctors, lawyers, drivers, teachers, scientists, manufacturers, craftsmen) from going homeless once their jobs are automated away. This will need to be worked out at the government level — the sooner the better, because exponentials have a habit of creeping up on people and then surprising society with the intensity and rapidity of the disruptive change they bring. I’m confident that humanity can and will rise to the challenges ahead, and it is well to remember that economics is driven by technology, not the other way around. Education, as usual, is definitely the key to meeting these challenges head on and in a fully informed way. My only concern is when governments will actually start taking this situation seriously enough to start taking bold action. There certainly is no time like the present.

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Apr 30, 2018

Google Doodle Honors Mathematician Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss

Posted by in categories: education, information science, mathematics

A German mathematician, physicist and astronomer, Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss rose from humble origins to become one of the world’s greatest minds.

Born in 1777 in Brunswick, then part of the Holy Roman Empire, Gauss was the only child of poor parents who had received little or no formal education. His mother was illiterate. But when Gauss started school at age seven, he was quickly recognized as a child prodigy who could solve complex math problems in his head.

While still a teenager, Gauss became the first person to prove the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, a math theory to determine whether quadratic equations can be solved.

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