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Archive for the ‘engineering’ category

Apr 14, 2024

MIT researchers reveal incredible method to remove array of harmful pollutants from water: ‘Most technologies focus only on specific molecules’

Posted by in categories: chemistry, engineering

Researchers at the MIT Department of Chemical Engineering have created a new method of cleaning micropollutants from water, using zwitterionic molecules — i.e., molecules with the same number of positive and negative charges.

Devashish Gokhale, a PhD student and one of the researchers, explained zwitterionic molecules by comparing them to magnets.

Continue reading “MIT researchers reveal incredible method to remove array of harmful pollutants from water: ‘Most technologies focus only on specific molecules’” »

Apr 13, 2024

Cornell researchers develop lithium EV battery that charges under 5 mins

Posted by in categories: engineering, sustainability, transportation

A research team led by Lynden Archer, professor and dean of Cornell Engineering, has developed a new lithium battery that can charge in as little as five minutes. This could help address anxiety associated with the charging time of electric vehicles (EVs) and increase their adoption.

In their bid to reduce emissions from transportation, countries worldwide are looking to electrify various modes of transport. Road-based transport such as cars, buses, and trucks have led this transformation, aiming to even ban the sale of fossil fuel-powered cars in the next decade.

Apr 12, 2024

Novel Quantum Effect Observed in a Crystalline Material

Posted by in categories: engineering, particle physics, quantum physics

Physicists have observed a novel quantum effect termed “hybrid topology” in a crystalline material. This finding opens up a new range of possibilities for the development of efficient materials and technologies for next-generation quantum science and engineering.

The finding, published on April 10th in the journal Natur e, came when Princeton scientists discovered that an elemental solid crystal made of arsenic (As) atoms hosts a never-before-observed form of topological quantum behavior. They were able to explore and image this novel quantum state using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and photoemission spectroscopy, the latter a technique used to determine the relative energy of electrons in molecules and atoms.

This state combines, or “hybridizes,” two forms of topological quantum behavior—edge states and surface states, which are two types of quantum two-dimensional electron systems. These have been observed in previous experiments, but never simultaneously in the same material where they mix to form a new state of matter.

Apr 12, 2024

Breaking the Limits: Overcoming Heisenberg’s Uncertainty in Quantum Measurements

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, quantum physics

Aalto University researchers are the first in the world to measure qubits with ultrasensitive thermal detectors—thus evading the Heisenberg uncertainty principle.

Chasing ever-higher qubit counts in near-term quantum computers constantly demands new feats of engineering.

Among the troublesome hurdles of this scaling-up race is refining how qubits are measured. Devices called parametric amplifiers are traditionally used to do these measurements. But as the name suggests, the device amplifies weak signals picked up from the qubits to conduct the readout, which causes unwanted noise and can lead to decoherence of the qubits if not protected by additional large components. More importantly, the bulky size of the amplification chain becomes technically challenging to work around as qubit counts increase in size-limited refrigerators.

Apr 11, 2024

Complexity_Emergence_Editorial.pdf

Posted by in category: engineering

Emergent properties in complex systems and engineering challenges.


Shared with Dropbox.

Apr 11, 2024

Physicists discover a novel quantum state in an elemental solid

Posted by in categories: engineering, quantum physics

For more than a decade, scientists have used bismuth (Bi)-based topological insulators to demonstrate and explore exotic quantum effects in bulk solids mostly by manufacturing compound materials, like mixing Bi with selenium (Se), for example. However, this experiment is the first time topological effects have been discovered in crystals made of the element As.

“The search and discovery of novel topological properties of matter have emerged as one of the most sought-after treasures in modern physics, both from a fundamental physics point of view and for finding potential applications in next-generation quantum science and engineering,” said Hasan. “The discovery of this new topological state made in an elemental solid was enabled by multiple innovative experimental advances and instrumentations in our lab at Princeton.”

An elemental solid serves as an invaluable experimental platform for testing various concepts of topology. Up until now, bismuth has been the only element that hosts a rich tapestry of topology, leading to two decades of intensive research activities. This is partly attributed to the material’s cleanliness and the ease of synthesis. However, the current discovery of even richer topological phenomena in arsenic will potentially pave the way for new and sustained research directions.

Apr 10, 2024

Editorial: Nanotechnologies in Neuroscience and Neuroengineering

Posted by in categories: engineering, health, internet, nanotechnology, neuroscience

2 Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.

3Center for Bioelectric Interfaces of the Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russia.

4Department of Information and Internet Technologies of Digital Health Institute, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia.

Apr 10, 2024

Team is first ever to measure qubits with ultrasensitive thermal detectors, evading Heisenberg uncertainty principle

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, quantum physics

Chasing ever-higher qubit counts in near-term quantum computers constantly demands new feats of engineering.

Apr 8, 2024

A physicist uses X-rays to rescue old music recordings

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, media & arts, nanotechnology

Researchers are developing a technique that uses the special synchrotron X-ray light from the Swiss Light Source SLS to non-destructively digitize recordings from high-value historic audio tapes—including treasures from the Montreux Jazz Festival archive, such as a rare recording of the King of the Blues, B.B. King.

Magnetic tapes have almost completely disappeared from our lives and now only enjoy a nostalgic niche existence. However, significant quantities of these analog are still stored in the archives of sound studios, radio and TV stations, museums, and private collections worldwide. Digitizing these tapes is an ongoing challenge as well as a race against time, as the tapes degrade and eventually become unplayable.

Sebastian Gliga, physicist at PSI and expert in nanomagnetism, and his team are developing a method to non-destructively digitize degraded audio tapes in the highest quality using X-ray light. To achieve this goal, they have been collaborating with the Swiss National Sound Archives, which has produced custom-made reference recordings and provided audio engineering know-how. Now, a partnership with the Montreux Jazz Digital Project will help to further develop and test the method.

Apr 8, 2024

World’s First Real-Time Wearable Human Emotion Recognition Technology Unveiled

Posted by in categories: engineering, wearables

Professor Jiyun Kim and his team at the Department of Material Science and Engineering at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) have developed a pioneering technology capable of identifying human emotions in real time. This cutting-edge innovation is set to revolutionize various industries, including next-generation wearable systems that provide services based on emotions.

Understanding and accurately extracting emotional information has long been a challenge due to the abstract and ambiguous nature of human affects such as emotions, moods, and feelings. To address this, the research team has developed a multi-modal human emotion recognition system that combines verbal and non-verbal expression data to efficiently utilize comprehensive emotional information.

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