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Archive for the ‘climatology’ category

Oct 11, 2018

Hurricane Michael hits Florida

Posted by in categories: climatology, habitats

Aerial footage shows rows of damaged and destroyed homes lining the beach in Mexico Beach, Florida, after Hurricane Michael slammed into the town on October 10, 2018. It was the strongest hurricane on record to hit the Florida Panhandle.

Credit: WJAX

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Oct 4, 2018

Wide-scale US wind power could cause significant warming

Posted by in category: climatology

A Harvard study raises questions about just how much wind should be part of a climate solution.

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Sep 26, 2018

Scientists have been drilling into the ocean floor for 50 years – here’s what they’ve found so far

Posted by in categories: climatology, sustainability

The ocean floor holds unique information about Earth’s history. Scientific ocean drilling, which started 50 years ago, has yielded insights into climate change, geohazards and the key conditions for life.

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Sep 19, 2018

New study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

Posted by in category: climatology

In a new NASA-led study, scientists used GPS data to track where Hurricane Harvey’s stormwater went and how long it took to dissipate.

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Sep 19, 2018

Space Junk Now Presents a Clear and Present Danger

Posted by in categories: climatology, space

Pollution generated by human activity isn’t limited to the earth and its climate.

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Sep 16, 2018

This is how the world ends: will we soon see category 6 hurricanes?

Posted by in categories: climatology, mathematics

Not the end, but interesting… Also, note that hupercanes are possible products of some mathematical instability, where the speed start to grow almost unlimited after some threshold. Buts Cat 6 is not a hypercane, as in the hypercane winds will be 500 mph.


There is no such thing as a category 6 hurricane or tropical storm — yet. But a combination of warmer oceans and more water in the atmosphere could make the devastation of 2017 pale in comparison .

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Sep 15, 2018

Scientists: World’s warming; expect more intense hurricanes

Posted by in categories: climatology, computing, sustainability

WASHINGTON (AP) — A warmer world makes for nastier hurricanes. Scientists say they are wetter, possess more energy and intensify faster.

Their storm surges are more destructive because climate change has already made the seas rise. And lately, the storms seem to be stalling more often and thus dumping more rain.

Study after study shows that climate change in general makes hurricanes worse. But determining the role of global warming in a specific storm such as Hurricane Florence or Typhoon Mangkhut is not so simple — at least not without detailed statistical and computer analyses.

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Sep 14, 2018

‘Moonbeam’ at Last? Gov. Brown Says State Will Launch Satellite

Posted by in categories: climatology, satellites, sustainability

(AP) — California Gov. Jerry Brown said Friday that the state plans to launch its “own damn satellite” into orbit to battle climate change.

The man the late Chicago columnist Mike Royko famously dubbed “Gov. Moonbeam” made the announcement at the conclusion of a two-day climate summit he organized in San Francisco.

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Sep 11, 2018

Using 82 Terawatts of solar and wind to Green the Sahara as a side effect would cost at least $82 trillion

Posted by in categories: climatology, computing, solar power, sustainability

$82 Trillion to convert a desert to land that could grow crops to help feed the world…is it worth it?


Researchers simulated the effects of around 79 terawatts of solar panels and 3 terawatts of wind turbines. Computer modeling looked at the effect of covering 20 percent of the largest desert on the planet in solar panels and installing three million wind turbines.

There would be 16X the rain in the aridest parts of the Sahara, and double that of the Sahel.

Continue reading “Using 82 Terawatts of solar and wind to Green the Sahara as a side effect would cost at least $82 trillion” »

Sep 10, 2018

AI speeds up climate computations

Posted by in categories: climatology, information science, mathematics, robotics/AI, supercomputing

Realistic climate simulations require huge reserves of computational power. An LMU study now shows that new algorithms allow interactions in the atmosphere to be modeled more rapidly without loss of reliability.

Forecasting global and local climates requires the construction and testing of mathematical . Since such models must incorporate a plethora of physical processes and interactions, climate simulations require enormous amounts of . And even the best models inevitably have limitations, since the phenomena involved can never be modeled in sufficient detail. In a project carried out in the context of the DFG-funded Collaborative Research Center “Waves to Weather”, Stephan Rasp of the Institute of Theoretical Meteorology at LMU (Director: Professor George Craig) has now looked at the question of whether the application of can improve the efficacy of climate modelling. The study, which was performed in collaboration with Professor Mike Pritchard of the University of California at Irvine und Pierre Gentine of Columbia University in New York, appears in the journal PNAS.

General circulation models typically simulate the global behavior of the atmosphere on grids whose cells have dimensions of around 50 km. Even using state-of-the-art supercomputers the relevant that take place in the atmosphere are simply too complex to be modelled at the necessary level of detail. One prominent example concerns the modelling of clouds which have a crucial influence on climate. They transport heat and moisture, produce precipitation, as well as absorb and reflect solar radiation, for instance. Many clouds extend over distances of only a few hundred meters, much smaller than the grid cells typically used in simulations – and they are highly dynamic. Both features make them extremely difficult to model realistically. Hence today’s models lack at least one vital ingredient, and in this respect, only provide an approximate description of the Earth system.

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