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Archive for the ‘bioengineering’ category

Feb 12, 2019

Genetically Modified Super-Charged Cassava Could Help Stamp Out Malnourishment In Africa

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, food, genetics

Over 800 million people depend on cassava as a main food staple. Also known as manioc and yuca, this root vegetable also makes up around 50 percent of the caloric intake of around one-third of people in sub-Saharan Africa.

Unfortunately, it isn’t the most nutritious of food sources. As a result, iron and zinc deficiencies are sky high in many parts of Africa. It’s estimated that up to 75 percent of preschool children and 67 percent of pregnant women in Nigeria are anemic as a result of iron deficiency.

However, researchers have now developed super-charged cassavas using genetic engineering to enrich the plant with significantly higher levels of both iron and zinc.

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Feb 6, 2019

Ira Pastor — Dr. Michael Lustgarten — IdeaXMe

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, DNA, futurism, genetics, hacking, health, life extension, transhumanism

Very excited to have interviewed Dr. Michael Lustgarten in my role as longevity / aging ambassador for the ideaXme Show — Mike has been at the forefront of studying the 100 trillion organisms present in the human microbiome, their effect on human health and wellness, as well as a major proponent of metabolomics and biologic age tracking — A true future thinker in the area of extending human lifespan and healthspan

Feb 5, 2019

CRISPR revolutionized gene editing. Now its toolbox is expanding

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

The scientists who developed the revolutionary gene-editing system known as CRISPR are improving it with new tools that make it work better.

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Feb 4, 2019

The DIY designer baby project funded with Bitcoin

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, bitcoin, cryptocurrencies

Cryptocurrency, biohacking, and the fantastic plan for transgenic humans.

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Feb 3, 2019

Mollusk with magnetic teeth could be the key to nanoscale energy sources

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, energy, genetics, nanotechnology

A team of scientists have made a new discovery about naturally occurring magnetic materials, which in turn could lead to the development of nanoscale energy sources used to power next generation electronic devices. Researchers from Japan’s Okayama University and UC Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering worked together to study the gumboot chiton, a type of mollusk that produces teeth made of the magnetic mineral magnetite, in hopes of better understanding its genetic process.

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Feb 1, 2019

New U.S. Experiments Aim To Create Gene-Edited Human Embryos

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, health

CRISPR And Human Embryo Experiments Underway In The U.S. : Shots — Health News Despite outrage over gene editing in China that affected the birth of twins, research is underway in the U.S. to assess the safety and effectiveness of CRISPR tools to edit genes in human embryos.

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Jan 30, 2019

Scientists create a renewable source of cancer-fighting T cells

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

A study by UCLA researchers is the first to demonstrate a technique for coaxing pluripotent stem cells—which can give rise to every cell type in the body and which can be grown indefinitely in the lab—into becoming mature T cells capable of killing tumor cells.

The technique uses structures called artificial thymic organoids, which work by mimicking the environment of the thymus, the organ in which T develop from blood stem cells.

T cells are cells of the immune system that fight infections, but also have the potential to eliminate . The ability to create them from self-renewing pluripotent stem cells using the UCLA technique could lead to new approaches to cancer immunotherapy and could spur further research on T cell therapies for viral infections such as HIV, and autoimmune diseases. Among the technique’s most promising aspects is that it can be combined with gene editing approaches to create a virtually unlimited supply of T cells able to be used across large numbers of patients, without the need to use a patient’s own T cells.

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Jan 30, 2019

New Material Could Drive Wound Healing

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Imperial researchers have developed a new bioinspired material that interacts with surrounding tissues to promote healing.

Materials are widely used to help heal wounds: Collagen sponges help treat burns and pressure sores, and scaffold-like implants are used to repair broken bones. However, the process of tissue repair changes over time, so scientists are looking to biomaterials that interact with tissues as healing takes place.

“Creatures from sea sponges to humans use cell movement to activate healing. Our approach mimics this by using the different cell varieties in wounds to drive healing.” –Dr Ben Almquist, Department of Bioengineering.

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Jan 29, 2019

Business Forum: Photons are good business — An interview with Akira Hiruma

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, business, transportation

Early November 2018, Conrad Holton visited Japan at the invitation of Hamamatsu Photonics to attend the three-day Photon Fair, the company’s big event looking at its technologies and vision for the future. The Fair is held every five years near its headquarters in Hamamatsu City, about 150 miles southwest of Tokyo. In addition to thousands of customers, suppliers, and students who attended, the event was open to the public for one day to show the many technologies just emerging from the company’s research labs and how these technologies might impact fields ranging from the life sciences to transportation and manufacturing.


An interview with the CEO of Hamamatsu Photonics shows how an engineering company with a singular focus on photonics can succeed.

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Jan 27, 2019

Scientists Created The First Successful Human-Animal Hybrids

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical

Researchers have achieved a new kind of chimeric first, producing sheep-human hybrid embryos that could one day represent the future of organ donation – by using body parts grown inside unnatural, engineered animals. Scientists have created the first interspecies sheep-human chimera, introducing human stem cells into sheep embryos, resulting in a hybrid creature that’s more than 99 percent sheep – but also a tiny, little bit like you and me.

Admittedly, the human portion of the embryos created in the experiment – before they were destroyed after 28 days – is exceedingly small, but the fact it exists at all is what generates considerable controversy in this field of research.

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