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Archive for the ‘existential risks’ category

Feb 8, 2020

H-IIA conducts IGS Optical 7 launch

Posted by in categories: existential risks, government, satellites, surveillance

Making its first flight in over a year, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ H-IIA rocket lifted off from the Tanegashima Space Centre on Sunday with a reconnaissance satellite for the Japanese government. Liftoff occurred at10:34 local time 01:34 UTC, during a five-minute launch window.

Sunday’s launch deployed the IGS Optical 7 satellite for the Cabinet Satellite Intelligence Centre, an agency of the Japanese government responsible for space-based surveillance. IGS Optical 7 is part of the Information Gathering Satellite (IGS) or Joho Shushu Eisei (JSE) system, consisting of spacecraft collecting optical and radar images of the Earth.

Japan began development of IGS in the late 1990s, following North Korea’s attempted satellite launch in 1998. Although the North Korean launch failed to reach orbit, the rocket carrying it crossed Japan during its ascent, sparking fears that North Korean missiles would be able to target the islands. With IGS, Japan aimed to develop an independent reconnaissance capability to monitor future threats. The constellation can also be used for disaster monitoring and other civilian applications by the Japanese government.

Feb 8, 2020

Scientists resurrected a Wrangel Island mammoth’s mutated genes

Posted by in category: existential risks

O.o!


Some 4,000 years ago, a tiny population of woolly mammoths died out on Wrangel Island, a remote Arctic refuge off the coast of Siberia.

They may have been the last of their kind anywhere on Earth.

Continue reading “Scientists resurrected a Wrangel Island mammoth’s mutated genes” »

Jan 30, 2020

Underwater robot reveals hidden base of Antarctica’s ‘doomsday’ glacier

Posted by in categories: existential risks, robotics/AI

Icefin robot swam more than 1 kilometer to reach Thwaites Glacier’s grounding line.

Jan 26, 2020

The Rich Are Preparing For The Apocalypse Better Than You | VICE on HBO

Posted by in category: existential risks

Throughout human history, doomsayers — people predicting the end of the world — have lived largely on the fringes of society. Today, a doomsday industry is booming thanks to TV shows, movies, hyper-partisan politics, and the news media. With the country’s collective anxiety on the rise, even the nation’s wealthiest people are jumping on board, spending millions of dollars on survival readiness in preparation for unknown calamities.

We sent Thomas Morton to see how people across the country are planning to weather the coming storm.

Continue reading “The Rich Are Preparing For The Apocalypse Better Than You | VICE on HBO” »

Jan 23, 2020

🏺A while before the Sun was born

Posted by in categories: asteroid/comet impacts, existential risks, particle physics

Fyodor R.

Scientists recently identified the oldest material on Earth: stardust that’s 7 billion years old, tucked away in a massive, rocky meteorite that struck our planet half a century ago.

🏺Stardust

Continue reading “🏺A while before the Sun was born” »

Jan 23, 2020

NeoHuman Podcast: Evolutionary Cybernetics, Computational Physics and Consciousness Discussed

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, cosmology, existential risks, physics, robotics/AI, transhumanism, virtual reality

Evolutionary cyberneticist and digital philosopher Alex M. Vikoulov, author of The Syntellect Hypothesis, is interviewed by Agah Bahari, host and producer of NeoHuman podcast.

On this recent podcast, Alex Vikoulov, author of The Syntellect Hypothesis, is interviewed by NeoHuman podcaster Agah Bahari. Topics include evolutionary cybernetics, computational physics, consciousness, the simulation theory, the transcension hypothesis, the Global mind, AGI, VR, AR, psychedelics, technological singularities, transhumanism, Fermi Paradox, Digital Physics, objective reality, philosophy of mind, the extended mind hypothesis, absolute idealism, physics of time, the Omega Point cosmology, mind-uploading, synthetic telepathy, and more.

Watch a short intro here ↴.

Continue reading “NeoHuman Podcast: Evolutionary Cybernetics, Computational Physics and Consciousness Discussed” »

Jan 22, 2020

North Korea’s Nuclear Bomb Is Much Bigger than Previously Thought

Posted by in categories: existential risks, military, nuclear weapons

A new look at 2017 test data reveals an explosion 16 times as powerful than the one that leveled Hiroshima.

Scientists looking anew at a 2017 North Korean nuclear test discovered that the explosion was likely about two-thirds more powerful than U.S. officials previously thought.

Earlier data put the yield somewhere between 30 and 300 kilotons; the U.S. intelligence community said 140 kilotons. That was already the most powerful device tested by North Korea, topping a 2016 test by about an order of magnitude. But a new look at seismological data suggests that the blast was between 148 and 328 kilotons, and probably around 250 kilotons.

Continue reading “North Korea’s Nuclear Bomb Is Much Bigger than Previously Thought” »

Jan 22, 2020

Nuclear Annihilation Simulation Predicts 90 Million Deaths in First ‘Few Hours’

Posted by in category: existential risks

Welp o.o if we got a global emp we could disable all nukes.


This nuclear war simulator predicts what would happen in the first few hours of a major conflict between Russia and the U.S.

Continue reading “Nuclear Annihilation Simulation Predicts 90 Million Deaths in First ‘Few Hours’” »

Jan 22, 2020

The Air Force Is Developing An ‘EMP Missile’ To Fry North Korea’s Nukes

Posted by in categories: existential risks, military

Circa 2017


One of the options that the United States is looking at to counter North Korea’s nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles is an experimental weapon called CHAMP.

Jan 13, 2020

7 Billion-Year-Old Stardust Is Oldest Material Found on Earth

Posted by in categories: asteroid/comet impacts, existential risks, space travel

Scientists recently identified the oldest material on Earth: stardust that’s 7 billion years old, tucked away in a massive, rocky meteorite that struck our planet half a century ago.

This ancient interstellar dust, made of presolar grains (dust grains that predate our sun), was belched into the universe by dying stars during the final stages of their lives. Some of that dust eventually hitched a ride to Earth on an asteroid that produced the Murchison meteorite, a massive, 220-lb. (100 kilograms) rock that fell on Sept. 28, 1969, near Murchison, Victoria, in Australia.

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