Blog

Archive for the ‘3D printing’ category

Feb 15, 2019

3D-printed Mars habitat could be a perfect fit for early SpaceX Starship colonies

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats, robotics/AI, space travel, sustainability

Space architecture startup AI SpaceFactory achieved second place in the latest phase of a NASA-led competition, pitting several groups against each other in pursuit of designing a 3D-printed Mars habitat and physically demonstrating some of the technologies needed to build them.

With a focus on ease of scalable 3D-printing and inhabitants’ quality of life, as well as the use of modular imported goods like windows and airlocks, MARSHA lends itself impeccably well to SpaceX’s goal of developing a sustainable human presence on Mars as quickly, safely, and affordably as possible with the support of its Starship/Super Heavy launch vehicle.

Continue reading “3D-printed Mars habitat could be a perfect fit for early SpaceX Starship colonies” »

Feb 15, 2019

3D Printed Graphene Aerogel Enhances Supercapacitor Ability

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, materials

Researchers are using 3D printing to develop electrodes with the highest electric charge store per unit of surface area ever reported for a supercapacitor.

A research collaboration from the University of California Santa Cruz and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have 3D printed a graphene aerogel that enabled them to develop a porous three-dimensional scaffold loaded with manganese oxide that yields better supercapacitor electrodes. The recently published their findings in Joule. Yat Li, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at UC Santa Cruz, explained the breakthrough in an interview with R&D Magazine.

“So what we’re trying to address in this paper is really the loading of the materials and the amount of energy we can store,” Li said. “What we are trying to do is use a printing method to print where we can control the thickness and volume.

Continue reading “3D Printed Graphene Aerogel Enhances Supercapacitor Ability” »

Feb 15, 2019

3D Printed Graphene Aerogel Offers Highest-Ever Capacitance for a Supercapacitor

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, materials

After what has seemed a bit of a lapse in the timeline of their development, graphene-enabled supercapacitors may be poised to make a significant advance. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) have developed an electrode for supercapacitors made from a graphene-based aerogel. The new supercapacitor component has the highest areal capacitance (electric charge stored per unit of surface area) ever reported for a supercapacitor.

The 3D-printing technique they leveraged to make the graphene electrode may have finally addressed the trade-offs between the gravimetric (weight), areal (surface area), and volumetric (total volume) capacitance of supercapacitor electrodes that were previously thought to be unavoidable.

In previous uses of pure graphene aerogel electrodes with high surface area, volumetric capacitance always suffered. This issue has typically been exacerbated with 3D-printed graphene aerogel electrodes; volumetric capacitance was reduced even further because of the periodic large pores between the printed filaments.

Continue reading “3D Printed Graphene Aerogel Offers Highest-Ever Capacitance for a Supercapacitor” »

Feb 14, 2019

3D Printed Dress from Iris van Herpen Pushes Boundaries of Fashion

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, education

Too many people believe that art and science exist as polar opposites and have delineated the disciplines as existing in an irreconcilable dichotomy that acts to drive the two types of knowledge apart. This conceptualization of the knowledge cultures is akin to placing two magnets next to each other such that their same poles when aligned repel each other: it foolishly denies the absolute attraction that exists when you simply flip one magnet the other way. Centuries ago, this attraction between art and science was understood as a given. The most easily identifiable product of this was a person such as Leonard da Vinci, whose work didn’t move back and forth between science and art, but rather understood the two as inextricably interwoven.

In the world of 3D printing, there appears to be developing an understanding that the bubbles of art and science are actually simply contorted ways of viewing a larger field of human knowledge. Dutch designer Iris van Herpen likes to play in the field and apply her understanding to the creation of fashion collections. Her pieces are explorations that encourage collaborative efforts because of the breadth of expertise in a wide variety of fields needed to create the pieces she has in mind. For a 2013 collection, she worked with photographer Nick Knight, who had captured images of the way water moved when splashed upon the nude body, in order to turn those images into garments. It became clear to Knight that van Herpen understood the inseparable nature of art and science, as he explained in an interview with the New York Times:

Continue reading “3D Printed Dress from Iris van Herpen Pushes Boundaries of Fashion” »

Feb 14, 2019

Soon you may be able to 3D print clothing in your own home

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats

In contrast, 3D-printed clothes can simply be dumped into blenderlike machines that turn the plastics into powder that can then be used to print out something new. And since 3D printing easily allows for custom sizing, the process is inherently frugal with materials.

But there are plenty of challenges that must be overcome before 3D-printed apparel goes mainstream.

One is cost. Even the smallest home 3D printers run several hundred dollars. A printer capable of printing human-sized apparel is beyond the reach of individual consumers. And it takes far longer to print an article of clothing than to produce a similar article via weaving or knitting. Peleg’s jacket, for example, takes about 100 hours to print.

Continue reading “Soon you may be able to 3D print clothing in your own home” »

Feb 14, 2019

NASA to Advance Unique 3D Printed Sensor Technology

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, robotics/AI, space travel

A NASA technologist is taking miniaturization to the extreme.

Technologist Mahmooda Sultana

Continue reading “NASA to Advance Unique 3D Printed Sensor Technology” »

Feb 11, 2019

ScienceAlertVideosA Week in Science with RiAus

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, 4D printing, science

Forget about 3D printing, the future is 4D printing creates shapes that can assemble themselves into predetermined 3D structures. The structures are made of plastic and smart memory materials that morph into different shapes. Discover more about this amazing technology in A Week in Science by RiAus.

Read more

Feb 9, 2019

Scottish space firm unveils world’s largest 3D printed rocket engine

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, energy, engineering, satellites

Scottish space firm Orbex has unveiled an engineering prototype of a rocket that’s at the heart of plans to develop a UK satellite launch capability.

The company, which is involved in plans to develop the UK’s first spaceport in Sutherland, Scotland unveiled the rocket at the opening of its new headquarters and rocket design facility in Forres in the Scottish Highlands.

Designed to deliver small satellites into Earth’s orbit, Orbex Prime is a two-stage rocket that’s claimed to be up to 30% lighter and 20% more efficient than any other vehicle in the small launcher category. It is also the first commercial rocket engine designed to work with bio-propane, a clean-burning, renewable fuel source that cuts carbon emissions by 90% compared to fossil hydrocarbon fuels.

Continue reading “Scottish space firm unveils world’s largest 3D printed rocket engine” »

Feb 1, 2019

Forget everything you know about 3D printing — the ‘replicator’ is here

Posted by in category: 3D printing

Rather than building objects layer by layer, the printer creates whole structures by projecting light into a resin that solidifies. Rather than building objects layer by layer, the method creates whole structures by projecting images onto a resin that solidifies.

Read more

Feb 1, 2019

Watch a Super-Fast 3D Printer Scientists Call the “Replicator”

Posted by in category: 3D printing

It prints using light.


3D printers work by laboriously printing objects layer by layer. For larger objects, that process can take hours or even days.

Continue reading “Watch a Super-Fast 3D Printer Scientists Call the ‘Replicator’” »

Page 1 of 7512345678Last