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Jan 21, 2022

The End of Cosmic Dark Ages: How NASA’s Roman Space Telescope Could Expand on Hubble’s Deepest View

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

A team of astrophysicists has created a simulated image that shows how the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope could conduct a mega-exposure similar to but far larger than Hubble’s celebrated Ultra Deep Field Image. This Hubble observation transformed our view of the early universe, revealing galaxies that formed just a few hundred million years after the big bang.

“Roman has the unique ability to image very large areas of the sky, which allows us to see the environments around galaxies in the early universe,” said Nicole Drakos, a postdoctoral scholar at the University of California Santa Cruz, who led the study. “Our study helps demonstrate what a Roman ultra-deep field could tell us about the universe, while providing a tool for the scientific community to extract the most value from such a program.”

Continue reading “The End of Cosmic Dark Ages: How NASA’s Roman Space Telescope Could Expand on Hubble’s Deepest View” »

Jan 20, 2022

Cosmic Birefringence from Planck Data Release 4

Posted by in categories: physics, space

We search for the signature of parity-violating physics in the cosmic microwave background, called cosmic birefringence, using the Planck data release 4. We initially find a birefringence angle of β=0.30±0.11 (68% C.L.) for nearly full-sky data. The values of β decrease as we enlarge the Galactic mask, which can be interpreted as the effect of polarized foreground emission. Two independent ways to model this effect are used to mitigate the systematic impact on β for differen… See more.


We search for the signature of parity-violating physics in the cosmic.

Microwave background, called cosmic birefringence, using the Planck data.
release 4. We initially find a birefringence angle of $\beta=0.30\pm0.11$ (68%

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Jan 20, 2022

Humans Didn’t Invent Mathematics, It’s What the World Is Made Of

Posted by in categories: mathematics, physics

Many people think that mathematics is a human invention. To this way of thinking, mathematics is like a language: it may describe real things in the world, but it doesn’t “exist” outside the minds of the people who use it.

But the Pythagorean school of thought in ancient Greece held a different view. Its proponents believed reality is fundamentally mathematical. More than 2,000 years later, philosophers and physicists are starting to take this idea seriously.

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Jan 19, 2022

How To Build The Universe in a Computer

Posted by in categories: computing, physics, space, transhumanism

This series is absolutely fantastic. Especially for Transhumanist non-astrophysicists like me!


Thank you to Wren for supporting PBS. To learn more, go to https://wren.co/start/spacetime.

Continue reading “How To Build The Universe in a Computer” »

Jan 19, 2022

There are 40 billion billions of black holes in the universe

Posted by in categories: alien life, evolution, physics

How many black holes are out there in the Universe? This is one of the most relevant and pressing questions in modern astrophysics and cosmology. The intriguing issue has recently been addressed by the SISSA Ph.D. student Alex Sicilia, supervised by Prof. Andrea Lapi and Dr. Lumen Boco, together with other collaborators from SISSA and from other national and international institutions. In a first paper of a series just published in The Astrophysical Journal, the authors have investigated the demographics of stellar mass black holes, which are black holes with masses between a few to some hundred solar masses, that originated at the end of the life of massive stars. According to the new research, a remarkable amount around 1% of the overall ordinary (baryonic) matter of the Universe is locked up in stellar mass black holes. Astonishingly, the researchers have found that the number of black holes within the observable Universe (a sphere of diameter around 90 billions light years) at present time is about 40 trillions, 40 billion billions (i.e., about 40 × 1018, i.e. 4 followed by 19 zeros!).

A new method to calculate the number of black holes

As the authors of the research explain: This important result has been obtained thanks to an original approach which combines the state-of-the-art stellar and binary evolution code SEVN developed by SISSA researcher Dr. Mario Spera to empirical prescriptions for relevant physical properties of galaxies, especially the rate of star formation, the amount of stellar mass and the metallicity of the interstellar medium (which are all important elements to define the number and the masses of stellar black holes). Exploiting these crucial ingredients in a self-consistent approach, thanks to their new computation approach, the researchers have then derived the number of stellar black holes and their mass distribution across the whole history of the Universe.

Jan 19, 2022

Light from behind supermassive black hole detected for first time

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

The first direct observation of light from behind a supermassive black hole confirms a prediction in Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

Jan 19, 2022

Sonifying science: from an amino acid scale to a spider silk symphony

Posted by in categories: physics, science

Sonifying science: from an amino acid scale to a spider silk symphony – Physics World.


Markus Buehler and Mario Milazzo explain how they have been able to explore new avenues of research by translating living structures into sound.

Jan 19, 2022

Tardigrades could be the first interstellar space travellers

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

A team of physicists, philosophers and biologists have come up with a list of organisms that could withstand the harsh conditions of interstellar space, and tardigrades take the top spot.

Jan 19, 2022

Light-matter interactions simulated on the world’s fastest supercomputer

Posted by in categories: physics, supercomputing

Light-matter interactions form the basis of many important technologies, including lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and atomic clocks. However, usual computational approaches for modeling such interactions have limited usefulness and capability. Now, researchers from Japan have developed a technique that overcomes these limitations.

In a study published this month in The International Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, a research team led by the University of Tsukuba describes a highly efficient method for simulating light-matter interactions at the atomic scale.

What makes these interactions so difficult to simulate? One reason is that phenomena associated with the interactions encompass many areas of physics, involving both the propagation of light waves and the dynamics of electrons and ions in matter. Another reason is that such phenomena can cover a wide range of length and time scales.

Jan 19, 2022

An international group of astrophysicists

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

led by specialists from the University of Barcelona, ​​discovered a huge population of black holes, which seemed to “lurk” in the globular star cluster Palomar 5 in the Milky Way. In the distant future, this cluster will completely consist of black holes.

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